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2017 in review: The top ten World Bank education blogs

Anne Elicaño-Shields's picture
Celebrating education. (Photo: World Bank)


As the editor of the World Bank’s education blog, I get weekly submissions from our education experts from all corners of the globe. Provocative and informative, our bloggers write about some of the education sector’s most hotly debated issues today.

Here are 2017’s most-read blog posts:

#10 There are cost-effective ways to train teachers

Teachers are the single most important factor affecting how much students learn. However, talent and heart aren’t enough to make a good teacher- as in all professions, one must train (and continue to train!) to be truly effective. This can be a big challenge in countries with fewer resources for education. Read about how 8,000 teachers in disadvantaged districts in Ghana upgraded their skills while simultaneously teaching in schools.

The implications of automation for education

Harry A. Patrinos's picture
Also available in: Français | Español | 한국어
Will workers have the skills to operate new technology? Education can help. (Photo: Sarah Farhat / World Bank)​


Automation is heralding a renewed race between education and technology. However, the ability of workers to compete with automation is handicapped by the poor performance of education systems in most developing countries. This will prevent many from benefiting from the high returns to schooling.

Schooling quality is low
 
The quality of schooling is not keeping pace, essentially serving a break on the potential of “human capital” (the skills, knowledge, and innovation that people accumulate).  As countries continue to struggle to equip students with basic cognitive skills-  the core skills the brain uses to think, read, learn, remember, and reason- new demands are being placed.

The skills that matter in the race between education and technology

Harry A. Patrinos's picture
Also available in: 中文
Technology rapidly changes the workplace and the skills demanded, making current workers less employable. One approach is to think about the kind of work that technology cannot replace.
(Photo: Curt Carnemark / World Bank)
 


Depending on to whom you listen, automation, robotics, and artificial intelligence (AI) will either solve all our problems or end the human race. Sometime in the near future, machine intelligence is predicted to surpass human intelligence, a point in time known as “the singularity.” Whether the rise of the machines is an existential threat to mankind or not, I believe that there is a more mundane issue: robots are currently being used to automate production.

在教育与科技的竞赛中决定胜负的技能

Harry A. Patrinos's picture
Also available in: English
(Photo: Curt Carnemark / World Bank) 
 

自动化技术、机器人和人工智能要么能解决我们所有的问题,要么会终结全人类——从不同的人那里,你可能会听到不同的意见。
 
预计在不远的将来,机器的智能将会战胜人类,这一时点被称为“奇点”。而抛开机器的崛起对人类的威胁是否真实存在不说,还有一个更加实实在在的问题:机器人当前被大量用于自动化生产。
 
经济学家理查德·弗里曼(Richard Freeman)主张,机器人可以替代工人,甚至能替代高技能的专业人士。麻省理工学院(MIT)教授埃里克·布伦乔尔森(Erik Brynjolfsson)和安德鲁·麦克菲(Andrew McAfee)也指出,随着电脑变得更加强大,企业对某些工种的需求将会减少。

Online education’s potential in Latin America starting to be tapped

Juliana Guaqueta Ospina's picture
Law student at Catholic University of Peru, Jean Franco Gutierrez Quevedo studies at the library in Lima, Peru on June 27, 2013. Photo © World Bank/Dominic Chavez

Four years ago, while sitting on a plane heading for a business development trip to Asia, a colleague asked me if I had heard of a new course from Stanford University in which more than 100,000 students enrolled after it was put online. A nascent company called Coursera was behind the initiative, he told me. My interest piqued, I contacted Coursera founders Andrew Ng and Daphne Koller. A few short months later, the IFC decided to invest, the start of a relationship that continues to blossom.