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girls education

A push for keeping adolescent girls in school in Malawi and Zambia

Christin McConnell's picture
Secondary School students from southern Malawi gather for their general assembly (Christin Mcconell/World Bank)

I asked Martha, a Form Four (Grade 12) student at a secondary school in southern Malawi, if she considered herself a role model. Completing her education hasn’t been easy for Martha – being sent home for weeks at a time when her family struggled with school fees, trying to avoid the distractions of boys, and staying on top of challenging coursework are among the challenges she deals with.

Globally, periods are causing girls to be absent from school

Oni Lusk-Stover's picture
Also available in: Español  |  Francais
Student at primary school in Freetown Sierra Leone. Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank

A UNESCO report estimates that one in ten girls in Sub-Saharan Africa misses school during their menstrual cycle. By some estimates, this equals as much as twenty percent of a given school year.

Many girls drop out of school altogether once they begin menstruating. Should young women miss twenty percent of school days in a given year due to a lack of facilities or a lack of information or a lack of sanitary products?

Strong teachers are stepping up to educate girls in Afghanistan

Mabruk Kabir's picture
A physics class in Afghanistan held outdoors, due to the shortage of classroom space. Photo Credit: Mabruk Kabir


Malaka runs a tight ship. The principal of an all-girls primary school nestled deep in the heartland of Balkh – a mountainous province in Afghanistan – what sets Malaka apart isn’t her formidable management skills. It is the unwavering commitment to her students.

Welcoming Michelle Obama to the World Bank and furthering a commitment to girls’ education

Rachel Cooper's picture
First Lady of the United States, Michelle Obama and World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim advocate for girls and women across the world. Photo: Grant Ellis / World Bank

My elder sisters could not get an education because at that time, there was no primary school in the village. For me it was difficult too, my school had no facilities, no water, toilet or rooms for 80 girls. Had this school not been built I would be out of school.” These are the words of Zarghony, the youngest child in a family of six and a beneficiary of the Promoting Girls’ Education in Balochistan Project (PGEB). Zarghony was once among the 62 million girls around the world who are out of school but now she benefits from a safe and secure learning environment.

Aucune fille ne doit être laissée pour compte – L’éducation en Afrique

Claudia Costin's picture
Also available in: English


Pour la Journée internationale de la femme, souvenons-nous des difficultés auxquelles sont confrontées les filles en matière d’éducation

No girl left behind - Education in Africa

Claudia Costin's picture
Also available in: Français


On International Women’s Day, let’s remember the challenges girls face in education.


What would your life be like with only five years of schooling? For many girls around the world, this is the most education they can expect and they are the lucky ones. Across Africa, 28 million girls between the ages of about 6 and 15 are not in school and many will never even set foot in a classroom.

Inspired by Malala: Raising Girls’ Voices

Carolyn Reynolds's picture


Wow.  I’ve been fortunate to be involved in many impactful events during my years at the World Bank, but one of the most memorable will always be the conversation between 16 year-old girls’ education advocate Malala Yousafzai and World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim during our Annual Meetings last Friday, in honor of the International Day of the Girl Child.

Bond management, the global financial crisis, and girls' education: Which one of these things is not like the others?

Halsey Rogers's picture

At a time of fundamental uncertainty on global financial markets, how should the World Bank help countries respond? Mohamed El-Erian, CEO of the global bond management giant PIMCO, took on this question during his recent talk at the World Bank, which was part of the PREM seminar series. One of his answers may come as a surprise: Invest in girls' education!

First, some background: El-Erian is one of the most influential figures in the world of finance. His firm manages $1.8 trillion in assets, an amount that comfortably exceeds Japan's foreign-exchange reserves, and he's on Foreign Policy magazine's list of Top 100 global thinkers. As a longtime former IMF official, El-Erian is also intimately familiar with international financial institutions.