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Research and Publications

New report makes it easy to explore data on skills development

Viviana Roseth's picture
Data is fundamental in determining how education can develop the skills that the labor market needs.

Education and training play an important role in ensuring that youth develop the skills they need to live independent and prosperous lives. The research is clear: youth are more affected by unemployment than any other age group. Around the globe we have seen the political, economic and social consequences of young people not having jobs. Governments and international development organizations have turned to education and training initiatives as one tool to enable youth to find jobs or launch their own businesses.

Implementing stronger and more credible student assessment systems

Alan Ruby's picture
Students in a READ-financed Mozambique program take their exams. Photo by Jem Heinzel Nelson

Ed: This guest post is by Alan Ruby, senior scholar at the University of Pennsylvania’s Alliance for Higher Education and Democracy who also serves as a consultant to the World Bank, an adviser to  the Nazarbayev University in Kazakhstan, the Head Foundation in Singapore, and the American Institutes of Research. 

Nearly 50 years ago, 40 classmates and I spent the last two weeks of November taking our higher school certificate examinations. In a cavernous, hot, and poorly ventilated hall, we sat in widely-spaced rows, writing essays, solving mathematics and science problems, and answering multiple-choice questions. 

Resilience, refugees, and education for change

Harry A. Patrinos's picture


As the world struggles to cope with the stream of refugees coming out of Syria, there is an urgent need to advance education opportunities. This is not to just thwart radicalization, as United Nations special envoy for global education Gordon Brown argues, but to ensure that we invest in building refugee children’s human capital.

Putting a human face to statistics on vulnerable youth in Sub-Saharan Africa

Keiko Inoue's picture
Also available in: Français
Around 89 million youth, ages 12-24 years, are out of school in Sub-Saharan Africa.

In 2013, we went to Liberia to find better answers to this question: who are the vulnerable youth? We wanted to put a human face to statistics. Analysis of statistical data revealed that some youth are more vulnerable than others.  Rural youth, young mothers, ex-combatant youth, poor youth, and poorly-educated youth are especially at risk.

The “nini” youth of Latin America: Out of school, out of work, and misunderstood

Halsey Rogers's picture
Also available in: Español | Portuguese, International


The popular image of the out-of-school, out-of-work youth of Latin America is not generally a positive one.  For one thing, the term used to label them – “ninis” – defines them in the negative.  It comes fromni estudian ni trabajan”, the Spanish phrase for those who "neither study nor work.” 
 

Los “ninis” de América Latina: ni estudian ni trabajan ni son comprendidos

Halsey Rogers's picture
Also available in: English | Portuguese, International


La imagen popular de la juventud de América Latina que no estudia ni trabaja no es positiva. Por un lado, el término usado para etiquetarlos –“ninis”– los define en  negativo. Proviene de la frase en español “ni estudian ni trabajan”.
 

A juventude “nem-nem” da América Latina: fora da escola, desempregada e incompreendida

Halsey Rogers's picture
Also available in: English | Español


A imagem popular da juventude latino-americana desempregada e fora da escola em geral não é positiva.  Em primeiro lugar, o termo pelo qual é rotulada – “nem-nem” – define os jovens de forma negativa.  Provém de “nem estudam nem trabalham”.
 

New Publication Discusses Teacher Supply, Training & Management in Anglophone Africa

By Aidan Mulkeen, Education Consultant, Africa Region

ML030S18 World Bank by World Bank Photo Collection.The last two decades have seen a profound change in participation in education in sub-Saharan Africa.  Enrollment in primary education has grown rapidly, there are now more children in school in Africa than at any other time in history, and most African children now enroll in school at some point. 

This remarkable achievement has involved increases in the number of teachers and placed national systems for teacher provision and management under increased stress. Countries have struggled to recruit sufficient qualified teachers, to deploy them to where they are needed, and to provide the management and support structures to ensure that quality education is delivered.