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Enseignement supérieur : l’obsession des classements

Francisco Marmolejo's picture
Also available in: English
Les élèves préparent un examen dans une bibliothèque. Photo: Arne Hoel / World Bank

Les classements des universités font désormais incontestablement partie du paysage de l’enseignement supérieur, aussi bien au niveau mondial qu’à l’échelon local. Ils occupent dans ce paysage une place de plus en plus importante et ont connu une prolifération phénoménale. Depuis que cette activité est devenue commerciale, les entreprises et organisations qui classent les universités ont gagné en sophistication. Et c’est dorénavant un fait acquis : ces palmarès influencent considérablement l’opinion des étudiants (actuels et à venir), des parents, des employeurs et des pouvoirs publics sur la qualité des établissements supérieurs.

Supporting India’s next generation of bright tech and science minds

Jessica Lee's picture
Ajay (third from right) was a Mitacs Globalink research intern at the University of Toronto.


With the Indian economy poised to be among the fastest growing economies in the world, there is great demand for world-class engineers to drive domestic value-addition, innovation and make the economy even more competitive globally. In this context, the Indian government’s Technical/Engineering Education Quality Improvement Project (TEQIP), supported by the World Bank, has been working with engineering colleges across the country to make them more responsive to a rapidly changing technical environment.

Are we obsessed with university rankings?

Francisco Marmolejo's picture
Also available in: Français
Students prepare for an exam in a library. Photo: Arne Hoel / World Bank


It is beyond doubt that rankings have become a significant part of the tertiary education landscape, both globally and locally.

In this landscape, rankings have risen in importance and proliferated in unimaginable ways. It’s become commercialized and, with it, so has the sophistication of companies and organizations that rank colleges and universities. Undoubtedly, rankings now play such a big role in shaping the opinions of current and potential students, parents, employers, and government about the quality of tertiary education institutions.

¿Estamos obsesionados con los rankings de universidades?

Francisco Marmolejo's picture
Photo: Arne Hoel / World Bank


No hay duda que los rankings se han convertido en una parte significativa del panorama de la educación superior en los ámbitos local y global. En este escenario, los rankings han crecido en importancia y han proliferado de maneras inimaginables toda vez que la comercialización de los mismos ha llevado a un alto grado de sofisticación de las compañías y organizaciones que se dedican a su elaboración y difusión. Hoy en día es evidente que los rankings juegan un papel no menor en contribuir a formar opiniones de los actuales y futuros estudiantes, padres de familia, empleadores y gobierno, en torno a la calidad de las instituciones de educación superior.

Learning about learning assessments

Andreas Schleicher's picture
High school students in Latin America review their notes.  Photo: © Charlotte Kesl / World Bank


How do large-scale student assessments, like PISA, actually work? What are the key ingredients that are necessary to produce a reliable, policy relevant assessment of what children and young people know and can do with what they know? A new report commissioned by the OECD and the World Bank offers a behind-the-scenes look at how some of the largest of these assessments are developed and implemented, particularly in developing countries. 

Promoting equity in education to prepare for a greying Europe

Christian Bodewig's picture
PISA measures the skills and knowledge of 15-year-old students in reading, mathematics and science.
Photo: Simone D. McCourtie / World Bank 

Investing in people starts by ensuring that graduates leave school with strong basic/foundational skills, such as in reading and mathematics. Such skills are critical for subsequent study, for quickly finding a first job, and for adapting to continuous technological change. But are countries in the EU ready to face that challenge?

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