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Information and Communication Technologies

Education – the analog foundation for our digital lives

Michael Trucano's picture
A technical education class


Earlier today the World Bank released the 2016 World Development Report.

This widely read World Bank flagship publication explores a topic of broad relevance in the fields of international development and development economics. This year's report, 'Digital Dividends,' examines the impact that the Internet and mobile networks are having (and not having) around the world.

Technology in Nepal’s classrooms: Using impact evaluation as a learning device

Quentin Wodon's picture


Impact evaluations are key to how we think about development. Pilot programs suggesting statistically significant impacts are hailed as breakthroughs and as candidates for scaling up. Programs without such clear impact tend to be looked down upon and may be terminated. This may not be warranted.  A primary function of impact evaluations should be to improve existing programs, especially in fields where evidence of positive impacts remains scarce. The experience of OLE Nepal, which is part of the OLE network and aims to improve learning and teaching through technology, is instructive in this regard.

The hypocrisy of developed-world educational technology proponents

Kentaro Toyama's picture



Increasingly, there is a curious trend in America in which the country’s wealthiest, best-educated, most tech-savvy parents work hard and pay good money to keep their children away from digital technology. For example, executives at companies like Google and eBay send their children to a Waldorf school where electronic gadgets are banned until the eighth grade. And, Steve Jobs famously told a reporter that he didn’t let his children use iPads: “We limit how much technology our kids use at home”.

What is it that these parents know? And, how should it affect technology policy in education around the world?

MOOC“慕课”在中国蓬勃发展

Yidan Wang's picture
Also available in: English


大规模在线公开课(MOOCs “慕课“)是指任何在线学习或运用技术手段开展教育。在拥有14亿人口的中国,这种课程正在快速发展。

中国政府期望通过慕课为教育系统带来“革命性”的变革,这包括减少城乡教育质量不均以及共享优质教育资源。政府的目标之一是在未来五年通过慕课对1,300万中小学教师进行培训。

MOOCs in China are growing

Yidan Wang's picture
Also available in: 中文



Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) refer to any online learning or use of education technologies. In China, a country of 1.4 billion people, these are growing.

The Chinese government expects MOOCs to bring “revolutionary” change to the education system by reducing inequity in quality of education between urban and rural schools and by sharing the best teaching resources. One of the government’s goals is to train 13 million k-12 (“k-12” is the sum of primary and secondary school years) teachers on education technology skills in the next five years through MOOCs. Yes, you read it correctly, 13 million teachers. 

The Doha Declaration on Quality Education In The Arab World: Data on Teachers

Nicole Goldstein's picture

Doha - Where the Arab World's Education Ministers met & endorsed the Doha DeclarationThe new buzz words in the World Bank are Open Data. Here, in our blog, we have been championing the cause of Open Data (see New Open Data Initiative Emphasizes Importance of Education Stats) and what it does for knowledge sharing and looking at development solutions for Education systems.

 

You may know that the President Bob Zoellick (also known as RBZ) recently delivered a pretty inspiring speech at Georgetown University at the end of September. He was advocating for a new perspective for the Bank: “Beyond the Ivory Tower to a New Research Model: Open Data, Open Knowledge, Open Solutions.”

 

From EduTech: School computers not working? There's an app for that!

 By Michael Trucano, Senior ICT & Education Specialist and EduTech blogger

open things up, and you never know what unexpected paths may lie ahead | img attribution at bottomLast week I attended a brainstorming meeting as part of the World Bank's 'Apps for Development' initiative, in preparation for a competition that will be announced in October to bring software developers and development practitioners together to develop useful software tools and data visualizations that use World Bank data. This is (hopefully!) just the first stage in a broader initiative over time exploring how approaches to  'open data' (and not just those generated or warehoused by the World Bank) can help contribute to creation of useful software tools to help with a variety of development challenges.