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Information and Communication Technologies

The skills that matter in the race between education and technology

Harry A. Patrinos's picture
Also available in: 中文
Technology rapidly changes the workplace and the skills demanded, making current workers less employable. One approach is to think about the kind of work that technology cannot replace.
(Photo: Curt Carnemark / World Bank)
 


Depending on to whom you listen, automation, robotics, and artificial intelligence (AI) will either solve all our problems or end the human race. Sometime in the near future, machine intelligence is predicted to surpass human intelligence, a point in time known as “the singularity.” Whether the rise of the machines is an existential threat to mankind or not, I believe that there is a more mundane issue: robots are currently being used to automate production.

在教育与科技的竞赛中决定胜负的技能

Harry A. Patrinos's picture
Also available in: English
(Photo: Curt Carnemark / World Bank) 
 

自动化技术、机器人和人工智能要么能解决我们所有的问题,要么会终结全人类——从不同的人那里,你可能会听到不同的意见。
 
预计在不远的将来,机器的智能将会战胜人类,这一时点被称为“奇点”。而抛开机器的崛起对人类的威胁是否真实存在不说,还有一个更加实实在在的问题:机器人当前被大量用于自动化生产。
 
经济学家理查德·弗里曼(Richard Freeman)主张,机器人可以替代工人,甚至能替代高技能的专业人士。麻省理工学院(MIT)教授埃里克·布伦乔尔森(Erik Brynjolfsson)和安德鲁·麦克菲(Andrew McAfee)也指出,随着电脑变得更加强大,企业对某些工种的需求将会减少。

Bootcamps: Raising expectations for girls in math, science and technology

Juliana Guaqueta Ospina's picture
Also available in: Español
A Laboratoria classroom in Peru
Laboratoria, a nonprofit organization that runs six-month courses, targets girls from low-income families who face major barriers to accessing higher education. (Photo: Laboratoria)


Intensive “bootcamp” training programs that develop coding and other computer science skills and directly connect students with jobs are becoming increasingly popular. In the U.S, there are already over 90 bootcamps—and they are taking root in Latin America too, helping to close the region’s skills and gender gaps.

“Bootcamps”: aumentan las expectativas de las niñas en los campos de matemáticas, ciencia y tecnología

Juliana Guaqueta Ospina's picture
Also available in: English
A Laboratoria classroom in Peru
Laboratoria, organización sin fines de lucro que dirige cursos de seis meses para niñas de familias de bajos ingresos que enfrentan barreras para acceder a la educación superior. Foto: Laboratoria

Four cautionary lessons about education technology

David Evans's picture
 Charlotte Kesl / World Bank
Technology in education is often seen as a solution. It holds promise, but caution is warranted.
Photo: Charlotte Kesl / World Bank


There is no denying that governments around the world are expanding investments in education technology, from inputs that students use directly (like Kenya’s project to put tablets in schools) to digital resources to improve the education system (like Rio de Janeiro’s school management system). As public and private school systems continue to integrate technology into their classrooms, remember that education technology comes with risks. 
 

Education – the analog foundation for our digital lives

Michael Trucano's picture
A technical education class


Earlier today the World Bank released the 2016 World Development Report.

This widely read World Bank flagship publication explores a topic of broad relevance in the fields of international development and development economics. This year's report, 'Digital Dividends,' examines the impact that the Internet and mobile networks are having (and not having) around the world.

Technology in Nepal’s classrooms: Using impact evaluation as a learning device

Quentin Wodon's picture


Impact evaluations are key to how we think about development. Pilot programs suggesting statistically significant impacts are hailed as breakthroughs and as candidates for scaling up. Programs without such clear impact tend to be looked down upon and may be terminated. This may not be warranted.  A primary function of impact evaluations should be to improve existing programs, especially in fields where evidence of positive impacts remains scarce. The experience of OLE Nepal, which is part of the OLE network and aims to improve learning and teaching through technology, is instructive in this regard.

The hypocrisy of developed-world educational technology proponents

Kentaro Toyama's picture



Increasingly, there is a curious trend in America in which the country’s wealthiest, best-educated, most tech-savvy parents work hard and pay good money to keep their children away from digital technology. For example, executives at companies like Google and eBay send their children to a Waldorf school where electronic gadgets are banned until the eighth grade. And, Steve Jobs famously told a reporter that he didn’t let his children use iPads: “We limit how much technology our kids use at home”.

What is it that these parents know? And, how should it affect technology policy in education around the world?

MOOC“慕课”在中国蓬勃发展

Yidan Wang's picture
Also available in: English


大规模在线公开课(MOOCs “慕课“)是指任何在线学习或运用技术手段开展教育。在拥有14亿人口的中国,这种课程正在快速发展。

中国政府期望通过慕课为教育系统带来“革命性”的变革,这包括减少城乡教育质量不均以及共享优质教育资源。政府的目标之一是在未来五年通过慕课对1,300万中小学教师进行培训。

MOOCs in China are growing

Yidan Wang's picture
Also available in: 中文



Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) refer to any online learning or use of education technologies. In China, a country of 1.4 billion people, these are growing.

The Chinese government expects MOOCs to bring “revolutionary” change to the education system by reducing inequity in quality of education between urban and rural schools and by sharing the best teaching resources. One of the government’s goals is to train 13 million k-12 (“k-12” is the sum of primary and secondary school years) teachers on education technology skills in the next five years through MOOCs. Yes, you read it correctly, 13 million teachers. 

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