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Poverty

Quality education needed to boost women’s economic empowerment

Keiko Inoue's picture
Better educated women secure brighter futures for themselves and lift entire households out of poverty.



While Hillary Clinton is cracking the glass ceiling, if not yet shattering it entirely, in the United States by becoming the first female presidential nominee of a major political party, recent analysis on U.S. women in the workforce presents a more sobering finding.

Second Chances: Giving Dhaka’s slum children an opportunity to go back to school

Mabruk Kabir's picture
12-year old Rafiq, selling ‘chotpoti’, a popular snack in Bangladesh. Photo Credit: Mabruk Kabir/World Bank

Deep in the winding alleys of a Dhaka slum, business was booming. Rafiq, an entrepreneurial 12-year-old, was selling snacks out of a makeshift food cart – and his customers couldn’t get enough.

The “nini” youth of Latin America: Out of school, out of work, and misunderstood

Halsey Rogers's picture
Also available in: Español | Portuguese, International


The popular image of the out-of-school, out-of-work youth of Latin America is not generally a positive one.  For one thing, the term used to label them – “ninis” – defines them in the negative.  It comes fromni estudian ni trabajan”, the Spanish phrase for those who "neither study nor work.” 
 

Los “ninis” de América Latina: ni estudian ni trabajan ni son comprendidos

Halsey Rogers's picture
Also available in: English | Portuguese, International


La imagen popular de la juventud de América Latina que no estudia ni trabaja no es positiva. Por un lado, el término usado para etiquetarlos –“ninis”– los define en  negativo. Proviene de la frase en español “ni estudian ni trabajan”.
 

A juventude “nem-nem” da América Latina: fora da escola, desempregada e incompreendida

Halsey Rogers's picture
Also available in: English | Español


A imagem popular da juventude latino-americana desempregada e fora da escola em geral não é positiva.  Em primeiro lugar, o termo pelo qual é rotulada – “nem-nem” – define os jovens de forma negativa.  Provém de “nem estudam nem trabalham”.
 

Yunus to youth: Create your own future

Robert Hawkins's picture


“What are you waiting for?  Get out there and create your future”.  This conveys the spirit of Mohammed Yunus’ lecture last week at the World Bank. His messages on social business and entrepreneurship raised a number of questions as to how we think about education, skills, employment and the future prospects of youth in the world.

Podcast: Can We Get All Children in School and Learning by 2020? Harvard interviews Halsey Rogers

Christine Horansky's picture

How we can make the next decade one in which all children, everywhere, are in school and learning? The World Bank's Lead Economist for education, Halsey Rogers, joins the Harvard EdCast from Washington to discuss the new Education Strategy 2020 and a global agenda for learning.

Indigenous Peoples, Poverty and Development

Harry A. Patrinos's picture

Blogging from the World Bank's Indigenous Peoples Research Dissemination Workshop in Washington DC.

As is well known, there are more 300 million indigenous peoples in the world.  While they make up fewer than 5 percent of the global population they account for about 10 percent of the world’s poor.  Next year, Cambridge University Press will publish my book with Gillette Hall on the state of the world’s indigenous peoples

As part of the dissemination process, we have brought together most of the contributors to our volume for a workshop in Washington D.C. today, to share their research with each other and with an audience of World Bank staff, researchers and others from the development community. We expect a lively discussion on our forthcoming publication, which covers countries in Latin America, Africa and Asia. 

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