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Make the Rich Pay for University: Changing Patterns of Returns to Schooling

Harry A. Patrinos's picture



At a time when students, parents and governments are looking with concern at ever increasing levels of student loan debt, the returns to schooling seem to be declining, on average, at least slightly.
 
The value one gets from an education, in terms of future earnings, has been decreasing over time. The returns to another year of schooling tend to decline as the level of schooling rises in an economy.

Leveling the Playing Field from the Start: The Power of Early Childhood Development

Claudia Costin's picture


Today, I had the pleasure of participating in a keynote discussion at the Education World Forum in London--a large annual gathering of education decisionmakers from around the world. We focused this morning on how to use and translate data generated by education systems into better policies and effective results.

My fellow panelists which included Baroness Lindsay Northover, Parliamentary Undersecretary of State at the UK’s Department for International Development, and Professor Eric Hanushek from Stanford University, made excellent points about the link between education outcomes and economic growth. They also spoke about the ways to reach the 58 million children from marginalized communities who remain out of school.
 
I chose to focus on investments in the youngest children, from birth to age 5, before they even enter primary school.

A System of Great Schools: Joel Klein’s Legacy in New York City

Harry A. Patrinos's picture

Imagine a situation where: there are low graduation rates; violence spills into the schools; where most students are poorly educated; where there is growing inequality; students are passed from grade to grade even if they don’t learn; and there are unemployed graduates – yet skilled jobs go unfilled.  Imagine a school system ruled by a government-run monopoly dominated by vested and political interests.  There is no accountability – nobody is held responsible for results.  There is little information or data available with which to manage the system.

Does this sound like a developing country you know?  But no, this isn’t a description of fragile state, or a low-income country.  It’s not a caricature of a developing country run by a corrupt leader, on the brink of social and economic decline.

It’s New York City in the early 2000s.

For Haiti, New Data Can Help Address Learning Gaps

Melissa Adelman's picture


With 95 percent of its population of 10 million under age 65, Haiti’s most abundant asset is its human capital. Given this large share of children, youth and working-age adults, education is both an ongoing challenge and policy priority for the Government of Haiti. Yet decision-making on education has been hampered by a lack of reliable data, with even basic information such as enrollment rates being difficult to estimate reliably. 

Where Health and Education Meet, Children Win

Carolyn Miles's picture


Every mom wants a healthy baby. And in the early days of a child’s life, parents and doctors understandably focus on how the baby’s physical development—is she gaining weight? Is he developing reflexes? Are they hitting all of the milestones of a healthy and thriving child?
 
But along with careful screenings for physical development, there is an excellent opportunity to tap into those same resources and networks to promote early cognitive, socio-emotional, and language development. This helps children everywhere have a strong start in life, ensuring that they are able to learn as they grow and fulfill their potential throughout childhood.

Investing in Young Children: Two New Resources on ECD

Quentin Wodon's picture


In recent years, a broad consensus has emerged on the fact that investing in young children is one of the best investments countries can make. And yet while investments in early childhood development (ECD) should be a priority, many countries fall short.  Tomorrow, the World Bank will release two new publications to serve as resources for those aiming to invest in ECD, whether they are government agencies, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), or private firms. 

Malala and the Nobel Peace Prize: What this Means for South Asia and the World

Amit Dar's picture


In South Asia, a region where girls are now going to school in unprecedented numbers, Malala means many things to many people. To parents who send their daughters to school with difficulty, she validates a growing belief in power of girls’ education to liberate families from poverty. To schoolgirls in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Sri Lanka and Nepal, she is an icon of victory and hope. And to governments and development partners, she represents the millions of girls who arrive in school every morning trusting that education will prepare them well for life, and also those so poor or disadvantaged that they do not enroll even at the primary level.

Reaching Children and Youth Stranded by the Ebola Crisis

Claudia Costin's picture
 
Children in the town of Gueckedou, Guinea, an area hard hit by the Ebola outbreak. Photo credits: ©afreecom/Idrissa Soumaré  EU/ECHO


​In a part of Sub-Saharan Africa where life is far from easy for most people, the Ebola epidemic is the most devastating event in a generation. With per capita incomes ranging between $400 and $700 a year, people living in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone can ill afford Ebola’s terrible toll on survival, health, and livelihoods. World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim was in West Africa last week to pledge our ongoing support to these countries to help them reach the goal of zero Ebola cases. 

More than 5 million children are out of school indefinitely due to the crisis, and the number is even larger if university-age students are taken into account.  But the crisis is not just the downtime for these millions of students of all ages affected by school and university closures. Its full magnitude is revealed in the loss of learning and the opportunities for progress that are forgone with each passing day.

You Can’t Manage What You Don’t Measure

Harry A. Patrinos's picture


When it comes to measuring student learning outcomes, you often hear critics refrain “you can’t fatten a cow by weighing him all the time,” in an attempt to say that you cannot truly educate students by spending all the time getting ready for testing and recording test scores. Of course not. But as the management guru Peter Drucker famously said, “If you can't measure it, you can't manage it.”

Education for a Creative Economy: The Case of Korea

Claudia Costin's picture



As countries strive to grow, build well-being and fight inequality, it is clear that education must adapt to changing global needs. This is true in all country contexts, including in advanced economies such as the Republic of Korea, where a high-performing education system already turns out skilled students who top the charts in international learning assessments such as PISA and TIMMS.

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