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The G7 Summit and Education for Shared Prosperity

Harry A. Patrinos's picture


Today marks the beginning of the G7 Summit, during which the leaders of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, the United States, the President of the European Council, and the President of the European Commission will convene in Brussels to discuss matters of the global economy.

A Happier Story about Education in Nigeria

Elizabeth King's picture


A few weeks ago news broke about another horrendous attack in schools in Nigeria. More than 200 teenage girls were abducted from a school in the remote north-east of the country. In November last year more than 40 schools were burned and destroyed in an attack that also killed around 30 teachers. Those attacks belie strong national support for education and its strong link to the country’s economic growth and poverty reduction. This support was expressed compellingly by students, employers and national leaders at the Nigerian Economic Summit in Abuja in March. The message was that transforming education will determine Nigeria’s place in Africa and in the world.

Eliminating Child Marriage to Boost Girls’ Education

Quentin Wodon's picture


Child marriage in developing countries remains pervasive. One-third of girls are married before age 18. That’s 39,000 girls each day, with 1 in 9 marrying before age 15.  Among countries with the highest prevalence of child marriage, girls with three years of schooling or less are up to six times more likely to marry young than girls with secondary education. The causality runs both ways: child marriage reduces educational attainment, and, conversely, girls with less access to quality education are more likely to marry early.

Education: Measuring for Success in Today’s World

Marguerite Clarke's picture
Also available in: Русский


It’s been said that learning is what most adults will do for a living in the 21st century. Sound a little exhausting? The fact is that there are fewer and fewer jobs being created that rely on rote tasks and memorization. There are more and more jobs that require creativity, teamwork, problem solving, and ongoing learning. Indeed, it’s fair to say that the illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn. Children need to start acquiring these skills and attitudes early on, which is why education systems around the world are increasingly focused on reforms that involve setting and measuring new goals for learning that will better ensure their graduates’ success in today’s world.

Образование: Оценивание для достижения успеха в современных условиях

Marguerite Clarke's picture
Also available in: English


Есть мнение, что в 21-м веке большинство взрослых будут зарабатывать на жизнь благодаря тому, что станут приобретать знания. Трудно, не так ли? Но дело в том, что сейчас появляется всё меньше рабочих мест, где требуется механическое выполнение заданий и простое запоминание. Всё чаще востребованными оказываются творческий подход, навыки работы в группе, умение решать проблемы и непрерывное обучение. Пожалуй, можно сказать, что в 21-м веке неграмотными будут считаться не те, кто не умеет писать и читать, а те, кто неспособен обучаться, забывать выученное ранее и научаться повторно. Необходимо, чтобы дети развивали такие навыки и отношение с самого начала; именно поэтому в образовательных системах разных стран всё больше внимания уделяют осуществлению реформ, которые предусматривают формулирование новых целей обучения и измерение степени их достижения, так чтобы с большей вероятностью обеспечить выпускникам успех в современном мире.

Are Children Learning Anything in School?

Harry A. Patrinos's picture


The total number of out-of-school children worldwide has declined from 108 million in 1999 to 57 million today.  While this is tremendous progress, a critical question remains:  Are they learning?  According to the latest estimates from UNESCO, more than 250 million school-aged children cannot read.

But there is some good news.  In a previous post I highlighted my recent paper with Noam Angrist, “An expansion of a global data set on educational quality: a focus on achievement in developing countries,” where we use existing sources of test score information to show that there are less-developed countries that have made major educational gains. In that post our comparison of test score gains from 1995-2010 for 128 countries gives the following list of top performers over the last 15 years: Jordan, Kenya, Madagascar, Trinidad and Tobago, and Tanzania, to name a few.

A Conversation about Early Childhood in Guyana, the Land of Many Waters

Peter Holland's picture



Guyana is on the U.N. list of Small Island Developing States, but don’t be fooled: It is not an island, nor is it particularly small.  Its Amerindian name means “Land of Many Waters,” a more accurate description, and a source of some of the challenges the country faces in providing quality education to children living in the most remote areas.

Report from Nigeria: Education Needs Intelligent Champions

Elizabeth King's picture


The hall was full all the way to the back and up to the balcony.  The audience was lively, contributing loud asides in their seats, applauding often, cracking inside jokes, and even occasionally arguing directly with those on stage.  You’d think I was at a political rally, but it was the 20th Nigerian Economic Summit in Abuja last month; the theme of the three-day summit was ”transforming education through partnerships for global competitiveness.”

Scaling up the Private Sector in Education: Three Lessons

Harry A. Patrinos's picture



This week the IFC – the World Bank Group’s private sector arm – holds its 6th International Private Education Conference.  The occasion prompted us to think about what it would take for the private sector to scale up and really make a difference to children’s lives across the globe.  

Teaching 21st Century Skills to Ready Students for the World of Work

Mohammed A. Khan's picture


What are the jobs of the future? How can I steer my daughter to a career which offers the best potential for secure employment? If I am honest with her, no one really knows. A decade ago, who had heard of an App Developer or a Chief Listening Officer? These jobs, like so many others, simply didn’t exist.

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