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Yunus to youth: Create your own future

Robert Hawkins's picture

“What are you waiting for?  Get out there and create your future”.  This conveys the spirit of Mohammed Yunus’ lecture last week at the World Bank. His messages on social business and entrepreneurship raised a number of questions as to how we think about education, skills, employment and the future prospects of youth in the world.

Fresh on Flipboard — read about our efforts to boost education

Bassam Sebti's picture

Also available in: Español | Français | العربية

From among 2,500 applicants, 20 year-old Fatima was able to secure a seat in an information technology (IT) class at an educational institute in Kabul, Afghanistan. The training of 209 students is delivered with financial support from the World Bank. 

Like Fatima, millions of children and youth across the world have been benefitting from World Bank-funded projects. The Bank is the largest external education financier for developing countries. It supports education through an average of $2.8 billion a year in new financing to help these countries achieve their education goals.

To further highlight the World Bank Group’s efforts in boosting education across the world, such as Fatima’s success story, we have launched our first free digital magazine on the popular news aggregation app, Flipboard.

Results-based financing for higher education reforms in Madhya Pradesh, India

Kavita Watsa's picture
Students in Madyha Pradesh, India.
Students in Madyha Pradesh, India.

A couple of months ago, I visited Chandra Shekhar Azad College in Sehore, about an hour’s drive from Bhopal, the capital of the state of Madhya Pradesh, India. It was a short visit, but long enough to see that college students the world over have similar dreams and see higher education as a way to realize them.

ASET can be a great asset to Africa

Sajitha Bashir's picture

The African continent is on the cusp of a major transformation. Many economies are growing, with growth driven by investments in infrastructure and energy, trade, and by a stable macro-economic environment. I think that this growth will lead to socio-economic transformation (with higher-income jobs and a better quality of life) if it is also accompanied by building skills and research capacity in applied sciences, engineering, and technology (ASET).

The hypocrisy of developed-world educational technology proponents

Kentaro Toyama's picture

Increasingly, there is a curious trend in America in which the country’s wealthiest, best-educated, most tech-savvy parents work hard and pay good money to keep their children away from digital technology. For example, executives at companies like Google and eBay send their children to a Waldorf school where electronic gadgets are banned until the eighth grade. And, Steve Jobs famously told a reporter that he didn’t let his children use iPads: “We limit how much technology our kids use at home”.

What is it that these parents know? And, how should it affect technology policy in education around the world?

Timor-Leste: Starting an education revolution

Harry A. Patrinos's picture
Also available in: Portuguese, International
Photo by: Cornelio Quintao De Carvalho / World Bank

In a blog, World Bank Senior Director for Education Claudia Costin praised Fernando La Sama de Araujo, the recently deceased Minister of Education of Timor-Leste, for his visionary leadership. 
Indeed, the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste should be praised for the progress it has made since gaining independence in 2002.  This is despite the fact that the country is still suffering the after-effects of a decade-long struggle for independence.

In early childhood programs, when is a papaya better than an apple?

Aliza Marcus's picture
More photos in a slideshow about early childhood development in Malawi  here

Today, on the Day of the African Child, we interview our World Bank colleague, Christin McConnell, about early childhood programs and her work in Malawi.

Celebrating a fighter for freedom and education

Claudia Costin's picture
Also available in: Portuguese, International

Fernando La Sama de Araujo, the recently deceased Minister of Education of Timor Leste, was a freedom fighter and a visionary leader. “La Sama”, which means unbreakable, dedicated his life to the service of his country, Timor-Leste and was recently engaged in a plan to improve the quality of education. I received this news with great sadness, especially due to the engaging meetings we had in Dili, where I was on mission just a few days before he passed away. 
Minister La Sama was a leader of Timorese students’ resistance movement in Indonesia and spent six years in prison in Jakarta, together with Xanana Gusmão. Following independence, he held several public positions: President of the National Parliament, Acting President, and Vice Prime-Minister. Following leadership transition in February 2015, Minister La Sama his position as Minister of State, Coordinating Minister of Social Affairs and Minister of Education. 

MOOCs in China are growing

Yidan Wang's picture
Also available in: 中文

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) refer to any online learning or use of education technologies. In China, a country of 1.4 billion people, these are growing.

The Chinese government expects MOOCs to bring “revolutionary” change to the education system by reducing inequity in quality of education between urban and rural schools and by sharing the best teaching resources. One of the government’s goals is to train 13 million k-12 (“k-12” is the sum of primary and secondary school years) teachers on education technology skills in the next five years through MOOCs. Yes, you read it correctly, 13 million teachers. 

On International Children’s Day, Reflecting on the Impact of Early Childhood Development

Daphna Berman's picture

On International Children’s Day, we reflect on the kind of world our children will inherit. To prosper in a rapidly changing world, all children need more than basic literacy and numeracy. They need to be creative, critical thinkers and problem-solvers. Early childhood development can help level the playing field from the early stages of life.