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South Asia

Labour Regulation and Job Creation in India

Anshul Pachouri's picture

Mumbai, India

India
has long been criticized for strict labour laws and burdensome business regulatory environment. This can also be easily substantiated by the fact that India is ranked 134 out of 189 economies in terms of ease of doing business by World Bank in 2014 (1). Indian labour market is subject to more than 50 central government laws and regulations that deals with range of subjects such as employment condition, social security, wages, industrial relations to name a few. As labour is a “concurrent” subject in Indian constitution, both state and central government can pass laws pertaining to this subject within their jurisdiction. As a result, there are numerous other state specific labour laws as well which varies from one state to other.

This Week in #SouthAsiaDev: August 15, 2014

Mary Ongwen's picture
We've rounded up 36 tweets, posts, links, and +1's on South Asia-related development news, innovation and social good that caught our eye over the last two weeks. Countries included:Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and,

Rampur Hydro – A Small Step towards Lighting Lives

Rohit Mittal's picture

The two Task Team Leaders, (from left) Kwawu Gaba and Rohit Mittal,
​with the Chairman-cum-Managing Director of SJVNL, Mr R P Singh


When a small Bank team, of which one of us was a member, first visited the project site in December 2004, it wasn’t exactly a picture-perfect scenario. We were deep in the Himalayas and it was the middle of winter. Barren mountainsides rose up all around us, the icy Satluj river flowed steadily down, and the wind was howling.

How could we possibly build a hydropower project in this forbidding terrain in a few years’ time? Stories of past challenges from the earlier Nathpa Jhakri project - about 15 kilometers upstream - came flooding into everyone’s mind. But failure was not an option. The Bank was reengaging in hydropower in India after a gap of more than 10 years, and a great deal was riding on each one of us. 

Now, more than a decade later, we find ourselves standing before the almost-fully built Rampur powerhouse. As a wonderful coincidence, both of us happen to be present as the first of the project’s six units roars into operation and is synchronized with India’s northern power grid.

The Bangladesh Remittance Story Reaffirmed

Zahid Hussain's picture



The Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics (BBS) has just released a Survey on the Use of Remittances. The survey provides interesting update on the demographic and economic characteristics of the 8.6 million Bangladeshi workers currently working abroad. Conducted during 12-23 June 2013, the survey enumerated 9,961 Remittance Receiving Households (RRHs) from all the seven divisions of the country.

Overall, the survey mostly reaffirms findings from previous surveys and studies about migration and remittance behavior of Bangladeshis.

Who are the migrants?
The overwhelming majority (97.4 percent) of migrants are males, married (67.1 percent), Muslims (97.8 percent) most of whom (78.2 percent) are less than 39 years old with majority (61.5 percent) having less than ten years of education.

The majority (over 57 percent) of the migrants have been staying abroad for over 5 years and a significant (22.3 percent) proportion (largely from Sylhet) have been staying abroad for over ten years. Most (91 percent) work as blue colored labor in Saudi Arabia, UAE, Malaysia, Oman, Kuwait, South Korea and Singapore.  Most of them (87.8 percent) received no formal training before leaving the country.

August 1, 2014: This Week in #SouthAsiaDev

Mary Ongwen's picture
We've rounded up 20 tweets, posts, links, and +1's on South Asia-related development news, innovation and social good that caught our eye this week. Countries included:Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and, Sri Lanka.

July 25, 2014: This Week in #SouthAsiaDev

Mary Ongwen's picture
We've rounded up 18 tweets, posts, links, and +1's on South Asia-related development news, innovation and social good that caught our eye this week. Countries included: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan

Boosting South Asian Trade – Carpe Diem!

Sanjay Kathuria's picture
sar-trade-manufacturing
Ismail Ferdous/World Bank

South Asia’s Commerce Ministers meet in Thimphu on July 24. Getting there would not have been easy for many of them, with no direct flights between Thimphu and four of the seven capitals. In June, when some of us convened for a regional meeting in Kathmandu, our Pakistani colleagues had to take a 20 hour flight from Karachi to Dubai in order to get to Kathmandu! This is symptomatic of the overall state of economic engagement within South Asia—in trade in goods and services, foreign direct investment and tourism.

South Asian countries’ trade policies remain inward-looking compared to other regions, and there are even bigger barriers to trade within the region. Today, South Asia today is less economically integrated than it was 50 years ago. Figure 1 below shows that intra-regional trade in South Asia accounts for less than 5 percent of total trade, lower than any other region. 

Combating Foot and Mouth Disease in Bangladesh

Shiro Nakata's picture
Professor Anwar Hossain and his research team at Dept. of Microbiology, University of Dhaka
Livestock production provides valuable income and savings for farmers in Bangladesh – many of whom are small scale dairy farmers in rural areas.  Foot and Mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most threatening diseases to animal health. Unfortunately, South Asia is known as a FMD endemic area, and FMD outbreaks have been recurrent. The disease is extremely infectious and significantly reduces the production of milk and meat as well as the value of cattle – very important assets that protect families from economic shocks. According to the Department of Livestock, Bangladesh loses as much as US$125 million annually due to FMD.
 
Vaccination is one of the effective strategies to prevent FMD infection. Due to a high rate of mutation in FMD virus, there is an urgent need for the development of safe and effective vaccines for FMD.
 
“Bangladesh spends a lot of money to import FMD vaccines – but these are produced for foreign strains of FMD viruses, and they are ineffective against the virus strains circulating in Bangladesh. We need to have vaccine development capacity of our own,” says Prof. Anwar Hossain, Department of Microbiology of University of Dhaka and Manager of the sub-project titled, Foot and Mouth Disease in Bangladesh: Genome Analysis and Vaccine Development Project.
Scientific Instruments Purchased under HEQEP

Prof. Anwar’s sub-project was awarded a competitive research grant of BDT 23.7 million (about US 304,000) from the Higher Education Quality Enhancement Project (HEQEP). His project is conducting studies to determine variation in FMD virus of Bangladesh origin and developing appropriate methods of prevention against FMD viruses. Using the fund, Prof. Anwar and his team upgraded their laboratory with essential modern scientific equipment such as real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) machine to read DNA sequences and bio-safety cabinet together with a lot of indispensable laboratory consumables.
 
Since its inception in 2011, the sub-project has made significant achievements on their research work. These include completion of epidemiological study of serotype and lineage of FMD viruses, isolation and genome-wide analysis of FMD virus in Bangladesh, and publishing papers in international academic journals.

A Lesson in Hydro-Pragmatism

Rajib Upadhya's picture
Nepali visitors survey the Nam Theun 2 reservoir. Rajib Upadhya/World Bank

The similarities are striking. Nepal and Lao PDR are both land-locked. Both are endowed with vast hydropower potential. Both aspire to middle income status by the first quarter of this century. To their advantage, both Nepal and Lao PDR border energy-starved neighbors and see regional energy trade as their ticket out of poverty. And both countries harbor ambitions to become the “battery” that powers growth and prosperity in their respective regions.
 
Yet Lao PDR is going places while Nepal is stuck in stasis.

To understand this conundrum, the World Bank Group facilitated a study visit to Lao PDR last week for senior political party leaders and journalists from Nepal. The visit included a tour of the groundbreaking 1,080 MW Nam Theun 2 Hydropower Project as well as meetings with hydropower champions in the Lao government, private sector developers and local communities.

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