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Disasters

Can Mapping Help Increase Disaster Resilience?

Marc Forni's picture



In the days following the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the World Bank disaster risk management (DRM) community worked to assess the damage, and support the Haitian government plan and enact what would become a massive and protracted recovery from this profound disaster. Accurate and up to date maps of the country were an important component of these planning efforts. These maps came from an unexpected source, a global community of volunteer mappers, who, using their internet connections and access to satellite imagery, were able to contribute to mapping Haiti from their own homes.
 
Following the Haiti earthquake, the World Bank, Google, and several other entities made high-resolution imagery of the affected area available to the public. Over 600 individuals from the global OpenStreetMap (OSM) community began digitizing the imagery, tracing roads, building outlines, and other infrastructure, creating what quickly became the most detailed map of Port au Prince that had ever existed.  Volunteers from 29 countries made about 1.2 million edits to the map, performing an estimated year of cartographic work in about 20 days. This effort catalyzed a rethinking of community mapping and open data within the World Bank and other international institutions.

I Will Construct My House Myself

Deepak Malik's picture
“I lost my home and everything in it when the heavens fell on us in June last year,” said Usha Devi.  She was one of 3,000 or so people living in the high valleys of Kedarnath in Uttarakhand when flash floods roared down the mountainside wiping out everything in their path - people, livestock, homes and livelihoods. “Since then, I have struggled to put my life together again,” Usha said, recalling the difficulties in starting life afresh in the region’s cold and unforgiving terrain. 
Usha Devi talks to Onno Ruhl, World Bank India Country Director
Usha Devi talks to Onno Ruhl, World Bank India Country Director. (Photo Credit: Ramchandra Panda)

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