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Disasters

Building up Bhutan’s resilience to disasters and climate change

Dechen Tshering's picture
Building Bhutans Resilience
Despite progress, Bhutan still has ways to go to understand and adapt to the impacts of climate change. And with the effects of climate change intensifying, the frequency of significant hydro-meteorological hazards are expected to increase. Photo Credit: Zachary Collier


The 2016 monsoon was much heavier than usual affecting almost all of Bhutan, especially in the south.
 
Landslides damaged most of the country’s major highways and smaller roads. Bridges were washed away, isolating communities.
 
The Phuentsholing -Thimphu highway which carries food and fuel from India to half of Bhutan was hit in several locations, and the Kamji bridge partially collapsed, setting residents of the capital city and nearby districts into panic for fear of food and fuel shortages.
 
Overall the floods drove down Bhutan’s gross domestic product by 0.36 percent.

While not as destructive as the 2016 monsoon, flash floods, and landslides are becoming a yearly occurrence along Bhutan’s roads.

How can Sri Lanka better protect its people against disasters?

Thomas Walker's picture
A recent World Bank report indicates that nine out of 10 of Sri Lankans may live in climate hotspots—or areas highly prone to floods or droughts—by 2050
A recent World Bank report indicates that nine out of 10 of Sri Lankans may live in climate hotspots—or areas highly prone to floods or droughts—by 2050

Sri Lanka has a long history of coping with weather impacts.  

About two thousand years ago, the country built one of the world’s first irrigation system to control its water supply.

This feat of engineering, which boasted hundreds of kilometers of channels, tanks, and innovative valve pits, helped the great kingdoms of Anuradhapura and Polonnaruwa flourish into sophisticated societies and protect their people against hunger.

Not unlike these early civilizations, modern social protection programs have sheltered those affected by disaster through financial assistance and other forms of support.

Today, building resilience to natural disasters and other shocks is more critical than ever.

Since 1980, the frequency of natural disasters worldwide has increased by 250 percent, and the number of affected people has more than doubled.

Sri Lanka is no exception. The country ranked fourth most vulnerable to climate change in 2016.

Further to that, a recent World Bank report indicates that nine out of 10 of Sri Lankans may live in climate hotspots—or areas highly prone to floods or droughts—by 2050.

The losses caused by significant shocks like natural disasters have long-lasting consequences.

Children, especially, can suffer permanent damages if they are not educated or fed correctly in their critical early years.  

And the loss of assets, livestock, and crops can severely hurt small business owners and farmers and further discourage them from investing.

Sadly, natural disasters hit the poor the hardest as they tend to live in disaster-prone areas, work in agriculture, and usually don’t have savings or access to credit.

When a shock hits, wellbeing declines as people cut back on food and other essentials due to their loss of income or the high cost of rebuilding their homes.

And while some people gradually restore their standards of living, some never fully recover and get stuck in poverty.

But the poor aren’t the only ones who need to worry about shocks.

Today, a third of Sri Lankans are just a shock away from falling into poverty.

Our analysis of the 2016 Household Income and Expenditure Survey reveals that a 20 percent sudden decrease in household welfare—or consumption shock—would more than double the poverty rate: almost 1 in 10 Sri Lankans would be poor.

If the shock triggered a 50 percent decrease in consumption, one in three Sri Lankan families would fall into poverty.

Technology can help Afghanistan better manage its natural disasters

Julian Palma's picture
Also available in: دری | پښتو
 Rumi Consultancy / World Bank
Photo Credit: Rumi Consultancy / World Bank

To associate a gun shot with foul play seems logical. But that’s not necessarily the case in Guldara, a district nearly 40 kilometers outside of Kabul City in Afghanistan.

Gun shots typically come from communities living at the top of the mountain to warn vulnerable downhill communities of potential flooding from the Guldara river. The Guldara river is both a blessing and a curse for the local communities.

Its water is the main source of livelihood since nearly 75 percent of the local economy depends on agriculture. It is also a threat to life and assets. In March 2017, when the mountain snow melted, heavy floods killed two children and washed away the only road that connects the city with Kabul.

استفاده از تکنالوژی خطرات ناشی از حوادث طبیعی در افغانستان را مهار ساخته میتواند

Julian Palma's picture
Also available in: English | پښتو
 Rumi Consultancy / World Bank
عکس: شرکت مشورتی رومی/ بانک جهانی


معمولاً فیر تفنگ کار غیرمنطقی و ناشایسته پنداشته میشود، اما در ولسوالی گلدره که تقریباً ۴۰ کیلومتر از شهر کابل فاصله دارد، چنین نیست. بعضی اوقات این فیر تفنگ توسط کسانی صورت میگیرد که در قلۀ کوه زندگی میکنند و هدف آن هشدار به اهالی پایینِ دره از احتمال سرازیر شدن سیلاب در دریای گلدره میباشد.

اهالی گلدره دریای گلدره هم یک نعمت و هم یک مصیبت می شمارند. این دریا بزرگترین منبع تأمین معیشت اهالی آن ولسوالی است زیرا تقریباً ۷۵ در صد اقتصاد آن وابسته به زراعت میباشد. به همین گونه این دریا یک منبع خطر برای زندگی و دارایی مردم نیز پنداشته میشود.

در ماه مارچ سال ۲۰۱۷ میلادی، زمانی که برف کوه ها آب شد، سیلاب شدید جان دو کودک را گرفت و یگانه راه ترانسپورتی را که این دره را به شهر کابل متصل میسازد، نیز تخریب کرد.

له ټکنالوژۍ څخه ګټه اخیستنه په افغانستان کې د طبیعي پېښو خطرونه مهارولۍ شي

Julian Palma's picture
Also available in: English | دری
 Rumi Consultancy / World Bank
انځور: د رومی مشورتي شرکت / د نړیوال بانک

د ټوپک ‌ډز معمولاً ناوړه او غیرمنطقي کار ګڼل کېږي، خو د ګلدرې په ولسوالۍ کې چې له کابل ښار څخه تقریباً ۴۰ کیلومتره لرې دی، داسې نه ده. کله کله د ټوپک ډز هغه وګړي کوي، چې د غره په لوړو څوکو کې اوسېږي او له دې سره هغو خلکو ته چې د درې په لاندې برخو کې مېشت دي، خبرداری ورکوي، چې کېدای شي د ګلدرې په سین کې سېلاب راشي.

د ګلدرې وګړي د ګلدرې سین هم یو نعمت ګڼي او هم یو مصیبت. دغه سین د دې ولسوالۍ د اوسېدونکو د معیشت او روزګار تر ټولو لویه منبع ده، ځکه چې د هغوی د اقتصاد شاو خوا ۷۵ سلنه پر کرنه ولاړ دی.

دا سین د دې خلکو سر او مال ته خطر هم بلل کیږي. د ۲۰۱۷ میلادي کال په مارچ میاشت کې، کله چې د غرونو واورې ویلې شوې، سخت سېلاب وبهېد او دوه ماشومان یې ووژل او هغه یوازینۍ لاره یې، چې دا ولسوالي له کابل سره نښلوي، ورانه کړه.

How can Bangladesh increase its resilience to disasters through data sharing?

Debashish Paul Shuvra's picture
 
How can Bangladesh increase its resilience to disasters?

Schools across Bangladesh are highly vulnerable to floods, cyclones, and earthquakes. How can the country mitigate and respond to the risks of these natural hazards?

By using the GeoDASH platform - a geospatial data sharing platform - the Directorate of Primary Education of Bangladesh has assessed 35,000 schools with respect to the type of infrastructure, water and sanitation facilities, access to roads, and overall capacity during natural disasters.

The GeoDASH platform is a reliable and extensive geographic and information (geospatial) data network.

These data are Geographic Information System (GIS) and other geolocation services-based information to represent objects or locations on a globally referenceable platform to enable mapping.

For example, locations of road network data can be merged with the flood risk map to get a single map for identifying vulnerable road communication in flood-prone areas.

This type of data will allow the Government of Bangladesh, communities, and the private sector to create, share and use disaster risk and climate change information to inform risk-sensitive decision making.

Better data sharing to improve the lives of Afghan refugees

Shubham Chaudhuri's picture
Also available in: دری | پښتو
A bus with returnees from Pakistan at the IOM Screening center on Turkham border in Nangarhar province
A bus with returnees from Pakistan at the IOM Screening center on Turkham border in Nangarhar province. Photo Credit: IOM Afghanistan / E. Schwoerer

Four decades of conflict, violence and uncertainty has made Afghans the world’s largest protracted refugee population and among the largest group of returnees in the past few decades. Each year as many as 100,000s Afghans are on the move.

Since 2002, some 5.8 million Afghan refugees and several million more undocumented Afghans have returned to Afghanistan. More than two million of these refugees and undocumented returnees have returned since 2015. Recent surges in returns such as the 2016 spike of over 600,000 returnees from Pakistan were recorded in just six months.
 
Most returnees relocate to urban and peri-urban areas where they find limited job opportunities and inadequate access to essential services, thus jeopardizing their reintegration prospects and fueling secondary displacement. Therefore, it is imperative that joint initiatives between international organizations and Afghan government ministries help support both returnees and the host communities in which they relocate.
 
To that end, the World Bank and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) today signed a data sharing agreement (DSA), which formalizes an existing partnership between the two organizations in Afghanistan.

تشریک بهتر معلومات میتواند وضعیت زندگی افغان های عودت کننده را بهبود بخشد

Shubham Chaudhuri's picture
Also available in: English | پښتو
A bus with returnees from Pakistan at the IOM Screening center on Turkham border in Nangarhar province
یک موتر بس حامل عودت کنندگان افغان از پاکستان در یکی  از مراکز سازمان بین المللی مهاجرت حین ارزیابی وضیعت آنها در مرز تورخم، ولایت ننگرهار. عکس از  ایوا سوریر ، سازمان بین المللی مهاجرت

چهار دهه جنگ، خشونت، ناامنی، اوضاع شکننده یی سیاسی، اجتماعی و اقتصادی افغانستان را به بزرگترین نفوس بیجا شدگان مبدل ساخته است. تخمین میشود که هرسال بیشتر از۱۰۰۰۰۰ افغان در حرکت از یکجا به جای دیگر میباشد.

از سال ۲۰۰۲ به این سو، حدود ۵،۸ میلیون پناهجوی افغان و چندین میلیون افغان ‌دیگر که اسناد و مدارک پناهجوی بودند، به افغانستان عودت نموده اند. این در حالیست که از سال ۲۰۱۵ به این سو بیشتر از ۲ میلیون پناهنده و مهاجر بدون  اسناد دوباره به کشور عودت نموده اند.

موج تازۀ برگشت مهاجرین از پاکستان درسال ۲۰۱۶ بخش مهم این روند را تشکیل میداد؛ چنانچه که در این جریان بیشتر از ۶۰۰۰۰۰ هزار عودت کننده صرف در ظرف شش ماه نخست این سال ثبت شده بودند. ارقام و معلومات موجود نشان میدهد که اکثر عودت کنندگان در محلات شهری و اطراف شهرها مسکن گزین میگردند زیرا انها نمیخواهند با مشکلات و محدودیت های فرصت های کاری، دسترسی به خدمات اساسی، و زیرساخت های اندک مواجه شوند. باور اینست که اگر آنان در این محلات جابجا نشوند ممکن مشکلات اساکان شان در مناطق دیگر مانع موفقیت ادغام مجدد شان شده و امکان دارد سبب بیجا شدن دوباره آنها گردد.

حمایت از عودت کننده گان و محلات میزبان که برگشت کننده گان در آن مناطق استقرار مجدد میابند، نیازمند ایجاد ابتکار و همکاریهای مشترک بیشتر میان موسسات بین المللی و وزارت های ذیربط حکومتی میباشد.

در همین راستا،  امروز بانک جهانی و سازمان بین المللی مهاجرت یک توافقنامۀ تشریک معلومات (DSA) را امضاء نمودند که مطابق آن همکاری های موجود میان این دو نهاد تقویت میابد.

د غوره معلوماتو شریکول کولی شي د راستنېدونکو افغانانو ژوند ښه کړي

Shubham Chaudhuri's picture
Also available in: English | دری
A bus with returnees from Pakistan at the IOM Screening center on Turkham border in Nangarhar province
له پاکستان څخه یو بس چې افغان کډوال په کې لیږدول کیدل او په تورخم پوله کې  د کډوالو نړیوال سازمان په یوه مرکز کې د هغوی وضعیت څیړنې پرمهال. انځور له ایوا سوریر/ د کډوالۍ نړیوال سازمان

په افغانستان کې څلور لسیزې جګړې، تاوتریخوالي، ناامنۍ، د افغانستان بد سیاسي، اقتصادي او ټولنیز وضعیت له امله زیاتره کسان ګډوال شوي دي. داسې اټکل کېږي چې هر کال له ۱۰۰۰۰۰ ډېر افغانان له یو سیمې څخه بلې سیمې ته کډه کوي.

 له ۲۰۰۲ کال راهیسې شاوخوا ۵،۸ ميلیون افغان پناه غوښتونکي او څو ميلیونه هغه افغانان چې د پناه غوښتونکو اسناد او مدرکونه لري بېرته افغانستان ته راستانه شوي دي. دا په داسې حال کې ده چې له ۲۰۱۵ کال راهیسې له ۲ ميلیونه ډېر هغه افغان پناه غوښتونکي او کډوال چې اسناد یې نه لرل بېرته هېواد ته راستانه شوي دي.

له پاکستان څخه په ۲۰۱۶ کال کې د کډوالو بېرته راستنېدل د دغه بهیر مهمه برخه جوړوي؛ په دغه بهیر کې یوازې د روان کال په لومړیو شپږو میاشتو کې له ۶۰۰۰۰۰ ډېر راستنېدونکي ثبت شوي و. دغه شمېرې ښيي چې ډېری راستنېدونکي په ښاري او اطرافي سیمو کې ځای پر ځای کېږي، ځکه دوی نه غواړي چې د بېکارۍ له ستونزو، اساسي خدمتونو ته د لاس رسي له لږو ستونزو سره مخ شي. باورکېږي، چې که دوی په دې سیمو کې ځای پر ځای نه شي ممکن د استوګنې په نورو سیمو کې ستونزې د دوی د راټولېدو مخه ونیسي او د بیا بېځایه کېدو لامل یې شي.

له راستنېدونکو او هغه سیمو څخه ملاتړ، چې راستنېدونکي په کې مېشت کېږي، د اړونده حکومتي وزارتونو او نړیوالو موسسو تر منځ ډېرو نوښتونو او همکاریو ته اړتیا لري. په همدې خاطر نن نړیوال بانک او د کډوالو نړیوال سازمان ( DSA ) د شریکو معلوماتو یو هوکړه لیک لاسلیک کړ.

From Japan to Bhutan: Improving the resilience of cultural heritage sites

Barbara Minguez Garcia's picture
This page in: 日本語
 Barbara Minguez Garcia 2018
When it comes to their heritage buildings, both Bhutan and Japan have one common enemy: Fire. A view of Wangduephodrang Dzong in Bhutan which was destroyed by fire in 2012. Credit: Barbara Minguez Garcia 2018

About 2,749 miles, three countries, and a sea separate Kyoto, Japan, and Thimphu, Bhutan. The countries’ languages are different, and so are their histories.

But when it comes to their heritage buildings, both nations have one common enemy: Fire.

And to help prevent fire hazards, there’s a lot Bhutan can learn from Japan’s experience.

To that end, a Bhutanese delegation visited Tokyo and Kyoto last year to attend the Resilient Cultural Heritage and Tourism Technical Deep Dive to learn best practices on risk preparedness and mitigation, and apply them to Bhutan’s context.

Such knowledge is critical as Bhutan’s communities live in and around great heritage sites.

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