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Disasters

Unboxing the Boxing Day Tsunami of 2004

Chulie De Silva's picture

Also available in: Spanish | العربية

After the devastating tsunami, the Southern coast road rebuilt with support from the World Bank. Photograph © Chulie de Silva

My mother Manel Kirtisinghe encapsulated what the loss of a loved one in the tsunami meant, when she wrote in her diary “What you deeply in your heart possess, you cannot lose by death." On 26 Dec. 2004, Prasanna went away leaving behind for me a lasting vacuum and a silent aching grief.” 
 
Prasanna was my brother and this year when we observe religious rituals in memory of him, my mother will not be there with us. She left us earlier this year. Prasanna was our bulwark and the trauma of his death was so intensely felt that it took us seven years to rebuild and return to our beloved house. My mother was happy to be back in the house she had come to as a bride in 1944, but she stubbornly refused to go to the back verandah or to walk on the beach - a ritual she did twice a day before the tsunami.
 
As my mother did, we all had our coping mechanisms to handle the pain. The grief is still with me hastily boxed and lodged inside me but about this time of the year the lid flies open and the horror spills out. The images gradually become more vivid, intense, horrifying. Like a slow moving movie, they appear…and the nightmares return.

Can Mapping Help Increase Disaster Resilience?

Marc Forni's picture



In the days following the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the World Bank disaster risk management (DRM) community worked to assess the damage, and support the Haitian government plan and enact what would become a massive and protracted recovery from this profound disaster. Accurate and up to date maps of the country were an important component of these planning efforts. These maps came from an unexpected source, a global community of volunteer mappers, who, using their internet connections and access to satellite imagery, were able to contribute to mapping Haiti from their own homes.
 
Following the Haiti earthquake, the World Bank, Google, and several other entities made high-resolution imagery of the affected area available to the public. Over 600 individuals from the global OpenStreetMap (OSM) community began digitizing the imagery, tracing roads, building outlines, and other infrastructure, creating what quickly became the most detailed map of Port au Prince that had ever existed.  Volunteers from 29 countries made about 1.2 million edits to the map, performing an estimated year of cartographic work in about 20 days. This effort catalyzed a rethinking of community mapping and open data within the World Bank and other international institutions.

I Will Construct My House Myself

Deepak Malik's picture
“I lost my home and everything in it when the heavens fell on us in June last year,” said Usha Devi.  She was one of 3,000 or so people living in the high valleys of Kedarnath in Uttarakhand when flash floods roared down the mountainside wiping out everything in their path - people, livestock, homes and livelihoods. “Since then, I have struggled to put my life together again,” Usha said, recalling the difficulties in starting life afresh in the region’s cold and unforgiving terrain. 
Usha Devi talks to Onno Ruhl, World Bank India Country Director
Usha Devi talks to Onno Ruhl, World Bank India Country Director. (Photo Credit: Ramchandra Panda)

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