Syndicate content

doing business

Doing better business to fight poverty

Duvindi Illankoon's picture
The new Doing Business ranking places Sri Lanka at 100 out of 190 economies, compared with 111 last year. This year Sri Lanka made it easier for businesses to register property, obtain permits, enforce contracts and pay taxes. Credit: World Bank

End Poverty Day fell on the 17th of October. Two weeks later, the new Doing Business rankings come out for this year.

If you’re wondering what the link is, here’s a quick summary: business-friendly regulations can be instrumental in lowering poverty at the national level.

This is one of those happy instances where economics, common sense and the data align.

A better regulatory environment encourages more businesses to register and expand, bringing more employers to the economy.

Then the market responds- not only do these employers create more jobs, but also going to offer better jobs to attract capable workers to their companies.

Ultimately, a reliable source of income is the catalyst to moving out of poverty.

Sounds too simple? Trust the numbers.

تسهیل هر بیشتر تجارت و کار در افغانستان

Shubham Chaudhuri's picture
Also available in: English | پښتو
چگونگه انجام تجارت در افغانستان بهبود یافته است
 

[tweetable]]علی الرغم دشواری های موجود برای پیشبرد تجارت و کسب و کار، دولت افغانستان اقدامات لازم را غرض تسهیل و بهبود شرایط برای  سرمایه گذاران رویدست گرفته است[[/tweetable]].
 
براساس اخرین گزارش سالانه انجام تجارت، که توسط بانک جهانی به منظور مطالعه مقررات تجارتی در ۱۹۰ کشور تهیه میگردد، امسال افغانستان در رده بندی جهانی انجام تجارت، از جایگاه ۱۸۳ در سال گذشته به ۱۶۷مین کشور در گزارش متذکره صعود نموده است. بدین ترتیب این کشور در صدر آنعده کشورهای برتر قرار گرفته که بهبود قابل ملاحظه را در راستای فراهم آوری تسهیلات لازم غرض انجام تجارت فراهم نموده است. این بار نخست است که افغانستان با تطبیق اصلاحات در پنج ساحۀ مقرراتی نه تنها سبب بهبود محیط کسب و کار برای  سرمایه گذاری های کوچک و متوسط گردیده، بلکه در تقویت حقوق و نقش سهمداران در تصمیم گیری های بزرگ شرکت ها و فراهم آوری تسهیلات به منظور دسترسی به قرضه نیز پیشقدم  شده است.
 
با توجه به آن که بیشتر از نصف نفوس افغان ها زیر خط فقر زندگی میکنند، ضروریست تا دولت افغانستان روند تقویت سرمایه گذاری های خصوصی را که باعث ایجاد فرصتهای شغلی میشود، تسریع بخشیده و برای انکشاف تشبثات خصوصی و ابتکارات تجارتی متشبثین کوچک و متوسط  زمینه های تشویقی و حمایوی بیشتر را فراهم سازد تا دامنه فعالیت های آنها گسترش یافته و در ایجاد فرصت های کاریابی نقش کلیدی را ایفا نمایند.
 
به منظور تحقق اصلاحات در محیط تجارت و سرمایه گذاری لازم است تا به گونه مؤثر و متداوم تلاش صورت گیرد، که خوشبختانه دولت افغانستان بمنظور تطبیق برنامه های اصلاحاتی در سال گذشته  جدیت به خرچ داده است. نتایج تطبیق این اصلاحات در سال گذشته نشان میدهد که بعضی محدودیت ها و موانع فراروی تاجران و سرمایه گذاران در ساحات ذیل کاهش یافته است:

Afghanistan eases doing business

Shubham Chaudhuri's picture
Also available in: دری | پښتو
Doing Business Better in Afghanistan


Despite a volatile business environment, Afghanistan has made gains to improve the ease of doing business in the country.

These gains resulted in Afghanistan’s ranking in Doing Businessa World Bank report that measures business regulations across 190 economies—jumping from 183 in 2018 to 167 in the 2019 report, earning the country a coveted spot in this year’s global top improvers.

This is a first for Afghanistan and the upshot of the record five reforms was to improve the business environment for small and medium companies, increase shareholders’ rights and role in major corporate decisions, and strengthen access to credit.

With more than half of the Afghan population living below the national poverty line, Afghanistan needs to catalyze private investment and create jobs, helping entrepreneurs advance their business initiatives and helping established private businesses, small and large, to grow and create jobs.

There is a great deal of work to do in this regard, but the good news is that Afghanistan is serious about improving its investment climate. An overview of the key reforms Afghanistan has undertaken in the last year shows how the country is easing constraints faced by entrepreneurs and investors:

په افغانستان کې د تجارت او کار لا آسانېدل

Shubham Chaudhuri's picture
Also available in: English | دری
په افغانستان د سوداګری ښه ترسره کول
 

د تجارت او کار او کسب پر وړاندې د شته ستونزو سره سره، د افغانستان دولت د پانګه اچونې لپاره د شرایطو د آسانتیا په موخه پر ځینو اقداماتو باندې لاس پورې کړی.
 
د تجارت د ترسراوي د وروستي کلني راپور پر اساس چې په۱۹۰ هیوادونو کې د تجارتي مقرراتو د مطالعی په موخه د نړیوال بانک لخوا چمتو کیږي، سږ کال افغانستان د یاد راپور په نړیواله درجه بندۍ کې له ۱۸۳ درجې څخه ۱۶۷ درجې ته پورته شوی دی. نو پدې اساس افغانستان د هغو هیوادونو په لړ کې راغلی کوم چې د سوداګری د ښه والي لپاره یې د پام وړ آسانتیاوې رامینځته کړې دي. دا لومړی ځل دی چې افغانستان په پنځو مقرراتي څانګو کې د اصلاحاتو له راوستو سره نه یوازې دا چې د کوچنیو او منځنیو پانګه اچونکو لپاره د کار او کسب چاپېریال ښه کړی، بلکه په لویو پریکړو کې د سهم لرونکو یا ونډوالو د ونډه اخیستنې د حقوقو تقویه کول او همدارنګه پورونو ته د لاسرسي په موخه د آسانتیاوو د برابرولو په برخه کې هم پرمختګ لیدل کیږي.
 
دې حقیقت ته په پام سره چې له نیمایي ډیر افغانان د بېوزلۍ تر کرښې لاندې ژوند کوي، اړینه ده چې د افغانستان دولت د خصوصي پانګه اچونې بهیر چې د کاري فرصتونو د رامینځته کیدو  سبب کیږي، لا ګړندی او غښټلۍ کړي او د تشبثاتو د پراختیا په خاطر د کوچنیو او منځنیو خصوصي متشبثینو د ابتکارونو  لپاره لا ډیرې تشویقي او هڅوونکې زمینې برابرې کړي تر څو د هغوې د فعالیتونو  پراخیدل  د کاري فرصتونو په جوړولو کې اساسي ونډه ترسره کړي. 
 
د تجارت او پانګه اچونې په چاپېریال کې د اصلاحاتو د پلي کیدو په موخه باید اغیزناکه او دوامداره هلې ځلې وشي، چې له نیکه مرغه د افغانستان دولت په تیر کال کې د اصلاحي پروګرامونو په پلي کیدو کې پوره جدیت ښودلی دی. په تیر کال کې د دې اصلاحاتو د پلي کیدو په پایله کې د سوداګرو او پانګوالو پر وړاندې په لاندې برخو کې ځینې خنډونه او محدودیتونه را کم شوي دي:

Commitment to reforms improves business climate in South Asia

Hartwig Schafer's picture
 
Rikweda, an Afghan fruit processing company in the Kabul Province is well on its way to restoring Afghanistan as a raisin exporting powerhouse—a status the country held until the 1970s when it claimed about 20 percent of the global market. Credit World Bank


Imagine a state-of-the-art processing plant that harnesses laser-sorting technology to produce a whopping 15,000 tons of raisins a year, linking up thousands of local farmers to international markets and providing job opportunities to women.
 
To find such a world-class facility, look no further than Rikweda, an Afghan fruit processing company in the Kabul Province that’s well on its way to restoring Afghanistan as a raisin exporting powerhouse—a status the country held until the 1970s when it claimed about 20 percent of the global market.
 
In Afghanistan’s volatile business environment, let alone its deteriorating security, Rikweda’s story is an inspiration for budding entrepreneurs and investors.
 
It also is an illustration of the government’s reform efforts to create more opportunities for Afghan businesses to open and grow, which were reflected in the country’s record advancement in the Doing Business 2019 index, launched today by the World Bank.
 
Despite the increasing conflicts and growing fragility, and thanks to a record five reforms that have moved Afghanistan up to the rank of 167th from 183rd last year, the country became a top improver for the first time in the report’s history.
 
And Afghanistan is not the only South Asian country this year that took a prominent place among top 10 improvers globally.
 
India – which holds the title for the second consecutive year – is a striking example of how persistence pays off, and the high-level ownership and championship of reforms are critical for success. Its ranking has improved by 23 places this year and puts India ahead of all other countries in South Asia. This year, India is ranked 77th, up from 100th last year. 

ශ්‍රී ලංකාවේ ආනයන සහ අපනයන යෙදෙන්නන්ගේ තොරතුරු දැනගැනීමේ අයිතිය තහවුරු කිරීම

Dinesha Nilakshi Samaranayake's picture

පසුගිය සැප්තැම්බර් මස 28 වෙනිදා ජාත්‍යන්තර තොරතුරු දැනගැනීමේ දිනය වශයෙන් රජය විසින් ප්‍රකාශයට පත් කරනු ලැබුවා. විශ්වයේම තොරතුරු ඇසුරු සැණකින් අතේ තිබෙන ජංගම දුරකථනය හරහා ලබාගත හැකි යුගයක තොරතුරු දැනගැනීමේ අයිතිය තහවුරු කරන්න වෙනම දිනයක් අවශ්‍ය දැයි ඔබට සිතෙන්නටත් පුළුවන්. නමුත් දිනපතා සිය භාණ්ඩ රේගුවෙන් නිදහස් කරගැනීමට පොර බදන කුඩා හෝ මධ්‍ය පරිමාණ වෙළඳ  මහතකුගෙන් මේ ගැන විමසුවොත්, සමහර විට ඔබේ එම අදහස වෙනස් වේවි .



කොළඹ, ගාලු පාරේ, සිය කාර්යාලයේ සිට ආනයන-අපනයන වෙළඳාම පවත්වාගෙන යන චමිල් පෙරේරාට තමන්ගේ ආනයන භාණ්ඩ රේගුවෙන් නිදහස් කරගැනීමේ ක්‍රියාවලිය ප්‍ර‍තිවාදියෙකු සමඟ පොර බැදීමකට දෙවැනි නැහැ. චමිල් වගේ බොහෝ පිරිස් තමන්ගේ වෙළඳාම් කටයුතු හරහා රටට ආදායමක් උපදවා දෙන අතරම නව රැකියා අවස්ථා උත්පාදනයටත් දායකත්වය ලබා දෙනවා. නමුත් ඉහත කී ක්‍රියාවලියේ දී රේගු කටයුතු ගැන හරි තොරතුරු ලබා ගැනීමට තිබෙන නොහැකියාව වගේම ක්‍රියාවලියේ ඇති සංකීර්ණ බව නිසා විශාල ලෙස කාලය හා මුදල් නාස්ති වීමකට ඔවුන් මුහුණ දෙනවා.

Trade facilitation reform in Sri Lanka can drive a change in culture

Marcus Bartley Johns's picture

Two years ago, we started counting how many Sri Lankan agencies were involved in trade facilitation processes such as issuing permits and managing the movement of goods in and out of the country.  We counted at least 22 agencies in this assessment, and today, the Department of Commerce estimates that number at least 34 agencies are involved in issuing permits or publishing regulations that affect trade.
 
We know trade is critical to Sri Lanka’s future and that there are strong links between trade, economic growth and poverty reduction.

However, the trading community reports a lack of transparency, confusion around rules and regulations, poor coordination between various ministries and a dearth of critical infrastructure—you can see why trade has suffered in Sri Lanka.

 

When the World Bank evaluates a country’s performance in critical rankings like Doing Business, the ease of trading across borders is one of the benchmarks we consider. In this, and in other lists like the Logistics Performance Index, Sri Lanka is underperforming compared with its potential. Here, the average trade transaction involves over 30 different parties with different objectives, incentives, competence and constituencies they answer to, and up to 200 data elements, many of which are repeated multiple times. This environment constrains the growth of Sri Lanka’s private sector, especially SMEs.  
 
But now for the good news. By ratifying the World Trade Organisation Trade Facilitation Agreement, Sri Lanka has signalled its determination to intensify reform efforts.