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Ushering in New Era of Openness and Transparency

Isabel Guerrero's picture

data.worldbank.org

The doors to the largest depository of development data in the world were just thrown open. Starting today, all our statistics are available online free of charge for all. The Open Data Access builds on the success of Data.Gov adopted by the US and UK and lets the global community create new applications and solutions to help poor people in the developing world.

Data, until now available through subscriptions only, is now accessible at data.worldbank.org. This is an important milestone for the World Bank, which complements the Access to Information reform. For many data is power. It is more than just numbers as it creates the space for dialogue based on facts and helps to foster new ideas.

Standardized cross-country data supports the work of development practitioners as they analyze and share information in the search of solutions to development challenges, in South Asia and elsewhere. It also encourages critical thinking amongst stakeholders to find solutions to malnutrition, child mortality, trade imbalances, underperforming school systems, income distribution, and so forth.

Data.worldbank.org will also increase research opportunities for students, academics, and journalists to broaden the understanding and dialogue of global issues. I wish I would have had access to this data when I was a student!

As a knowledge organization the Bank needs to consistently look to be more open and transparent, utilizing the latest advances in technology and information sharing. The new data site at the World Bank offers over 2,000 statistical series from poverty to pollution, population growth to exchange rate indexes, paved roads to the Millennium Development Goals, which will give a clearer picture of life in developing countries over time. The site has easy search, download, and visualization options with data available just a click away at data.worldbank.org.

So, help our counterparts take advantage of the exciting possibilities that this data opens up including for the young people today studying development. This blog is to invite you to share your innovation, ideas and questions with us and the rest of the development community.


For more information, go to data.worldbank.org and watch President Zoellick's video introducing the initiative.

Comments

Submitted by Marjolaine on
Hopefully latinamerican expertise can help Asia and asians. The new democracies are not transparent neither are the old ones...I worked over ten years in Latin-America, have my heart and roots there am now asian based and I am appaled at the rethorics and uselessness and unneccesary complications of hierarchical societies, not to speak of the arrogance of dominating castes...all of this at the cost of the future and wellbeing of women and children. Wishing your work at the WOrld Bank Asia the best of luck this is a very hard area to make goals real. In Nepal we have virtually no electricity and we move towards the 4th or 5th generation not going to school during to eternal bandhas, so called closure strikes... Resulting in the rise of crime and more insufficiency. The World Bank holds a tremendous resonsability poverty being such that economic relief may be able to prevent more unneccesary suffering. We need to focus on so many areas simultaneously I wish the world would tak at heart nepalese future. A beautiful country is completely exiled due to market interests of China and India conflicting and already remediating apparently. Wishing best of luck and may more beautiful people help Nepal. THank you Isabel GUerrero!

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