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Electrification planning made easier with new open source tool

Dimitris Mentis's picture


Evaluating the optimal way to expand electricity access across a country is difficult, especially in countries where energy related data is scarce and not centralized. Geospatial plans informing universal electricity access strategies and investments can easily take 18 to 24 months to complete.

A team working on a national electrification plan for Zambia last December did not have that much time.

They faced a six-month deadline to develop a plan, or they would miss out on a funding window, said Jenny Hasselsten, an energy specialist at the World Bank brought in to help with the electrification project in partnership with the government of Zambia.

Les minéraux et les métaux joueront un rôle essentiel dans la lutte contre la pollution de l’environnement

Daniele La Porta Arrobas's picture
Also available in: English


L’accord de Paris sur le climat, conclu en 2015, a été précédé d’une analyse des données scientifiques et de la viabilité des mesures d’adaptation aux conséquences du changement climatique et d’atténuation des émissions de gaz à effet de serre (GES). Si ces mesures s’intéressent en général aux conséquences de la réduction des émissions sur l’économie, les politiques publiques, la technologie et la durabilité du développement, elles s’attachent relativement peu aux implications d’un avenir sobre en carbone.

C’est pourquoi la Banque mondiale a décidé de se pencher sur cette question et de déterminer quels seraient les minéraux et les métaux pour lesquels la demande pourrait augmenter. Avec le rapport The Growing Role of Minerals and Metals for a Low-Carbon Future, qui s’intéresse à l’éolien, au solaire et au stockage d’énergie par batteries, la Banque donne à ce sujet la place qu’il mérite dans le dialogue actuel sur le changement climatique.

S’appuyant sur les scénarios climatiques et technologiques élaborés à partir des Perspectives des technologies de l’énergie de l’Agence internationale de l’énergie (AIE), la Banque mondiale a réalisé un ensemble de projections de la demande de produits de base jusqu’en 2050. Nous avons utilisé pour ce faire les meilleures estimations concernant l’adoption de trois technologies discrètes et respectueuses du climat (l’éolien, le solaire et le stockage d’énergie par batteries), qui sont nécessaires pour satisfaire aux spécifications des trois scénarios de réchauffement de la planète, à savoir 2C, 4C et 6C.

Minerals and Metals Will Be Key to a Clean Environment

Daniele La Porta Arrobas's picture
Also available in: Français


The 2015 Paris Agreement on Climate Change was preceded by analysis covering the science and viability of response measures, including both adaptation to the impacts of climate change and measures to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Mitigation issues typically covered the economic, policy, technology and sustainability implications of reducing emissions, but relatively little towards understanding the implications of a low-carbon future. 

For this reason, the World Bank decided to explore and study which minerals and metals will likely see an increase in demand to achieve a low-carbon future. Using wind, solar and energy storage batteries as proxies, The Growing Role of Minerals and Metals for a Low-Carbon Future report is one of the Bank’s contributions towards ensuring this topic is given its rightful place in the ongoing global climate change dialogue.

Based on climate and technology scenarios developed out of the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) Energy Technology Perspective, the World Bank developed a set of commodities demand projections up to 2050. We did so by providing best estimates on the uptake of three discrete climate-benefit technologies – wind, solar and energy storage batteries – required to help meet three different global warming scenarios of 20C, 40C, and 6oC. 
These technologies represent only a sub-set of a much broader suite of technologies and transmission systems required to truly deliver on a low-carbon future. Nevertheless, the findings are significant.

Policy shifts to strengthen China’s power sector reform

Yao Zhao's picture
Over the past few years, China saw more investment and installation in renewable energy than any other country in the world. In fact, in the period between 2010 and 2015, investment in the sector reached $377 billion, more than the next two countries - the United States and Germany – combined. China has 150 GW wind power and 77 GW solar photovoltaic power capacity compared to the U.S., for example, which has 80 GW in wind and 35 GW solar PV.

China has performed well above the global average, shined as the regional leader in East Asia, matched, if not outperformed, OCED countries in many dimensions, many countries with much lower investments and capacity have scored higher on renewable energy indicators.

Why the discrepancy?

The World Bank's Regulatory Indicators for Sustainable Energy (RISE) could shed some light on the issue. Launched in February 2017, RISE is a policy scorecard of unprecendented breadth and depth covering energy access, energy efficiency and renewable energy in 111 countries. It focuses on regulatory frameworks in these countries and measures that are within the direct responsibility of policy-makers. The result is based on data made available to the team at the end of 2015 and thoroughly validated.
 
 

Ten steps to boost the private sector’s role in Africa’s power transmission network

Samuel Kwesi Ewuah Oguah's picture
Image of girl from Africa: Canva
 


Africa has immense, untapped potential to meet the energy needs of its people and yet, two in three Africans still live without access to electricity. One aspect of the energy story that is not often in the spotlight is the power transmission network. But transmission – like generation and distribution of power – is a critical factor in getting electricity across thousands of miles to those who need it most. Building and maintaining reliable and extensive transmission infrastructure requires between $3.2 billion and $4.3 billion every year until 2040 – an investment goal the region’s electricity utilities, that are often state-run, cannot meet on their own.

Can the private sector help? We think so.

From slums to neighborhoods: How energy efficiency can transform the lives of the urban poor

Martina Bosi's picture

Villa 31, an iconic urban settlement in the heart of Buenos Aires, is home to about 43,000 of the city’s poor. In Argentina, paradoxically, urban slums are called ‘villas’ – a word usually tied with luxury in many parts of the world.
 

Clean Cooking in Bangladesh: the experience from one million households

Amit Jain's picture
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It was a dark, rainy evening when we first met Mamta in Bangladesh. She was huddled over a choolah (firewood burning cook stove), preparing rice and daal (lentils) for her three children. Smoke enveloped the room, which also doubles as the family’s bedroom when it rains. And her daughter asked: Why do I get tears in my eyes whenever you cook inside the room? ”
 
While some countries are far ahead on the energy access curve, like Australia, which is mulling ways to install mega battery packs in 100 days, others like Bangladesh are still grappling with the fundamental cookstove challenge and the right answer to Mamta’s daughter questions.
 
Getting to clean cooking universally, quite frankly, is one of the biggest challenges the global energy community has ever faced.

Riding the data revolution wave toward sustainable energy for all

Yann Tanvez's picture
Today, more than 1 billion people still live without access to energy, despite the multiplication of efforts from public, private and non-governmental actors. At the same time, global efforts abound to keep global warming under 2 degree Celsius, in accordance with the historic Paris Climate Agreement.

The explicit need of the hour is a significant increase of annual investments in energy access, renewables and energy efficiency – in the hundreds of billions of dollars’ range. So what role does open data play in such a scenario, you may wonder. 

Need solar resource data or maps? We've got an app for that

Oliver Knight's picture


Last month the World Bank launched a new Global Solar Atlas: a free, online tool that lets you zoom into areas anywhere in the world in great detail (1km resolution), and with downloadable poster maps for all developing countries. This new interactive tool is welcome news for anyone – policymaker or commercial developer – who has ever looked for solar maps or resource data from the cluttered and sometimes confusing array of public resources available
 
For this new atlas to have a greater impact, the following needs to happen.   
 
First, we need to cut down on the duplication and often wasted resources associated with national mapping projects. For example, before the Global Solar Atlas was launched, it cost $100,000-150,000 to commission a solar resource map for an average-sized country, and the work took around six months to complete. But with the Atlas,  we have completed this task for  all developing countries at a fraction of the cost, allowing funding to be channeled into higher value activities such as geospatial planning to identify renewable energy zones, or ground-based measurement campaigns to help further improve the solar resource models on which the results are based. This new tool could be an invaluable asset for governments, development agencies, and foundations so that they no longer commission country-based mapping efforts that are, in many cases, costly and may end up duplicating what the Atlas offers already.
 
Second, we need to continuously improve the data behind the Atlas, and other commercially available solar resource models, by investing in ground-based solar radiation measurement stations, with the first two years of data compiled and available in the public domain. But this is easier said than done. There are major gaps in the current measurement data network, especially in developing countries, and this adds to the uncertainty of the solar data provided. In turn, that increases developer risk and ultimately costs. Unfortunately, it is very easy to commission a poor quality measurement campaign, or to leave out key bits of data that are needed for eventual analysis. So adopting a universal set of standards is vital.
 
Third, public research institutes that have previously carried out solar resource assessments need to take a hard look at what value they add in this area. Over the last five years a number of commercial providers of solar resource data have emerged that maintain standing solar resource models, and work continuously to improve and update their solar data. This is an excellent example of public incubation and research being translated into successful start-ups, and should be celebrated. But the originators now need to move on to new frontiers of research to avoid crowding out commercial providers, and to help generate the next generation of methodologies and tools.

The story behind RISE numbers

Yao Zhao's picture

You’d think the most important thing about putting together a global scorecard is, well, the scores of course.

My experience working on RISE – Regulatory Indicators for Sustainable Energy – taught me that it takes a lot more than just data to deliver a one-of-a-kind report.

But hang on. What’s RISE, you ask? RISE is a groundbreaking tool that helps assess government support for sustainable energy investments, which are critical to achieve sustainable energy goals by 2030.

Nothing to this scale has been done before. RISE covers 111 countries, which account for over 90 percent of global population and energy consumption.

My very first time getting familiar with this data was when I worked on the pilot version of RISE . We had decided the best way to get people to understand this endeavor was to get them to play a “Who Wants to be a Millionaire” style game, but with energy access, renewable energy and energy efficiency data. What an eye opener. At that time, I thought the breadth of the pilot project -- 28 indicators, 85 sub-indicators and a 17-country coverage – was impressive.

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