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October 2012

Rosneft Wins Award for Gas Flaring Reduction Efforts in Russia

Yevgen Yesyrkenov's picture

Rosneft - Komsomolskoye oil field, APG booster compression stationAt the 10th anniversary of the Global Gas Flaring Reduction (GGFR) Partnership in London yesterday, the oil company Rosneft received an award for its Associated Gas Recovery Project on the Komsomolskoye oil field, located on the tundra in the heart of Russia over 3,000 kilometers east of Moscow. It’s gratifying to see that Rosneft is getting recognition for its hard work because this project is important not only in reducing flaring and greenhouse gas emissions, but also for the positive impact it is having on the local environment surrounding oil fields and for making better use of precious resources.

PP + EE = An Emerging Driver for Green Growth

Nicholas Keyes's picture

Public Procurement.  Energy Efficiency. These are not terms that one normally sees together.  And honestly, neither is a subject likely to keep many people awake at night. But taken together, they can be a powerful force for energy security, greenhouse gas mitigation, and low carbon development.

The logic is simple. Governments on average account for 2-5 percent of national energy use, and this can rise to 20-30 percent in countries with high heating demand or low electrification rates. Between 12 and 20 percent of a country’s gross domestic product passes through public procurement systems.  On both the energy and the procurement sides, government actions matter, influencing private sector purchasing and individual decision-making. Technical specifications used by governments also send signals to suppliers about the types of goods and services that will be in demand, which in turn can influence the products they produce.

A Global Coalition Can Tap Geothermal Power and Drive Development

Nicholas Keyes's picture


 

“We could go a week without working. But now there isn't one day without work.”

At her hair salon an hour outside Nairobi, Kenya, Elizabeth Kyalo is talking about the impact of electricity.  Specifically, the reliable supply of power that has allowed her to bring in more clients and build her business. “It has really helped us,” she says.

Energy is a primary driver of development.  A steady supply of electricity allows students to study at night, health clinics to expand services, markets to stay open later, and small businesses such as Elizabeth Kyalo’s to grow, creating jobs.