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Les minéraux et les métaux joueront un rôle essentiel dans la lutte contre la pollution de l’environnement

Daniele La Porta Arrobas's picture
Also available in: English


L’accord de Paris sur le climat, conclu en 2015, a été précédé d’une analyse des données scientifiques et de la viabilité des mesures d’adaptation aux conséquences du changement climatique et d’atténuation des émissions de gaz à effet de serre (GES). Si ces mesures s’intéressent en général aux conséquences de la réduction des émissions sur l’économie, les politiques publiques, la technologie et la durabilité du développement, elles s’attachent relativement peu aux implications d’un avenir sobre en carbone.

C’est pourquoi la Banque mondiale a décidé de se pencher sur cette question et de déterminer quels seraient les minéraux et les métaux pour lesquels la demande pourrait augmenter. Avec le rapport The Growing Role of Minerals and Metals for a Low-Carbon Future, qui s’intéresse à l’éolien, au solaire et au stockage d’énergie par batteries, la Banque donne à ce sujet la place qu’il mérite dans le dialogue actuel sur le changement climatique.

S’appuyant sur les scénarios climatiques et technologiques élaborés à partir des Perspectives des technologies de l’énergie de l’Agence internationale de l’énergie (AIE), la Banque mondiale a réalisé un ensemble de projections de la demande de produits de base jusqu’en 2050. Nous avons utilisé pour ce faire les meilleures estimations concernant l’adoption de trois technologies discrètes et respectueuses du climat (l’éolien, le solaire et le stockage d’énergie par batteries), qui sont nécessaires pour satisfaire aux spécifications des trois scénarios de réchauffement de la planète, à savoir 2C, 4C et 6C.

Minerals and Metals Will Be Key to a Clean Environment

Daniele La Porta Arrobas's picture
Also available in: Français


The 2015 Paris Agreement on Climate Change was preceded by analysis covering the science and viability of response measures, including both adaptation to the impacts of climate change and measures to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Mitigation issues typically covered the economic, policy, technology and sustainability implications of reducing emissions, but relatively little towards understanding the implications of a low-carbon future. 

For this reason, the World Bank decided to explore and study which minerals and metals will likely see an increase in demand to achieve a low-carbon future. Using wind, solar and energy storage batteries as proxies, The Growing Role of Minerals and Metals for a Low-Carbon Future report is one of the Bank’s contributions towards ensuring this topic is given its rightful place in the ongoing global climate change dialogue.

Based on climate and technology scenarios developed out of the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) Energy Technology Perspective, the World Bank developed a set of commodities demand projections up to 2050. We did so by providing best estimates on the uptake of three discrete climate-benefit technologies – wind, solar and energy storage batteries – required to help meet three different global warming scenarios of 20C, 40C, and 6oC. 
These technologies represent only a sub-set of a much broader suite of technologies and transmission systems required to truly deliver on a low-carbon future. Nevertheless, the findings are significant.

Mining leaders focus on governance during the commodities downturn

Paulo de Sa's picture
Photo via Shutterstock

At this year’s Investing in African Mining Indaba in Cape Town, South Africa, leaders are not hiding their concerns about the commodities downturn.

Government representatives express their frustration for not having benefited enough during the boom. Policymakers lament the lack of planning that has left their countries with no cushion in their budgets, and companies are looking to cut costs so they can weather the storm. And most importantly, communities are feeling the economic impact as mines purchase less local supplies, generate fewer jobs and halt some operations. 

Not only are things slowing down, but it seems a golden opportunity has passed us by. Fatima Denton, Director of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, highlighted that Africa is less industrialized today than it was in 1990. After the minerals super cycle of 2000-2013, the percentage of manufacturing of African economies actually declined from 12% to 11%. 

Local content in extractive industries: a tool for economic diversification and sustainable development

Anita Marangoly George's picture
Photo by Dominic Chavez / World Bank

When you ask young people from developing countries what they want for their country, they often say opportunity. The next generation wants jobs and knowledge; they want to be connected to the global economy.

Extractive industries can foster these types of opportunities through investment in skills training and transfer of technology to local workers and companies. These technical skills are demanded in the global marketplace today and empower workers to expand their horizons and lower their risk of unemployment. 

We are discussing these issues today at a “Reconciling Trade and Local Content Development” conference we are co-hosting with the Mexican Ministry of Economy. This event aims to share knowledge on how investment in extractive industries can be leveraged to generate opportunities for economic diversification and employment.

When extractives companies include local business in their supply chain they foster sustainable growth and help end poverty. The most valuable contribution to long term sustainability comes from the ability of extractive industries to generate benefits through productive linkages with other sectors. The International Finance Corporation (IFC) helped make this happen in Barmer, India, where we supported a Skill Development Center that trained 7,000 people to work in the operations of Cairn Energy. Not only did this training create direct job opportunities for the local population, but the acquired skills fostered the creation of an entire eco-system of small and medium-size enterprises that provided products and services to the oil company and related sectors.