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Croatia

How do courts impact the business climate… really?

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: Русский
Tim Cordell, Cartoonstock.com

We know that the justice system dampens the business climate in many of the countries where we work. In Bank reports, national strategies, and in common parlance, we lament that poorly performing courts delay business activity, undermine predictability, increase risks and constrain private sector growth. Going further, we conclude that weak justice systems disproportionately hamper micro, small and medium sized enterprises (MSMEs) because they have less buffer to absorb these problems - which can become make-or-break for their businesses.

So that’s the ‘what’ but, precisely, how, do courts impact businesses?
 

E-justice: does electronic court reporting improve court performance?

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: Română


More and more courts are going digital. But does this improve judicial performance?
 
Legal literature on ‘e-justice’ seems to think so. So too does the World Development Report, ‘Digital Dividends,’ which highlights the potential for ICT to improve the transparency and quality of government service delivery.
 
As electronic court reporting is one key aspect of this trend, we want to take the opportunity to look at the pros and cons of improving judicial performance in different contexts.

E-justiţia: Poate înregistrarea electronică a materialelor procedurale îmbunătăţi performanța instanţelor?

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: English


More and more courts are going digital. But does this improve judicial performance?
 
Legal literature on ‘e-justice’ seems to think so. So too does the World Development Report, ‘Digital Dividends,’ which highlights the potential for ICT to improve the transparency and quality of government service delivery.
 
As electronic court reporting is one key aspect of this trend, we want to take the opportunity to look at the pros and cons of improving judicial performance in different contexts.

A Toast to Food: Looking for innovation in Croatia’s food industry

Also available in: Русский
Innovation in food may seem obscure. There are only so many ways you can cut a carrot and you cannot simply reinvent the pig. But in an increasingly busy and wealthy world, the nature of demand for food is changing and scope exists for innovation in the way we deliver food to match people’s lifestyles. With demand for such new segments rapidly growing across Europe, Croatia seems well-poised to exploit this trend.

So why aren’t more farmers and firms champing at the bit to get a piece of this economic pie?



 

Што се случува ако не ја платите својата сметка? Извлечени поуки од централна и источна Европа

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: English


Сите ние имаме редовни сметки за плаќање за сеприсутните услуги кои ги трошиме – било да се работи за комунални услуги (вода, затоплување, електрична енергија итн.), кредитни картички, членства или отплати за автомобили.  Но, не сите ги плаќаат своите сметки.

Во целата економија овие неплатени сметки се претвораат во милиони предмети за извршување од мала вредност, кои честопати се неспорни. На економијата ѝ е потребен систем кој брзо, евтино и првично може да се справи со ваквиот долг.  Доколку системот за наплата на долгови потфрли тоа доведува до низа системски проблеми кои постепено ги задушуваат како судовите така и целата економија. 

Во неколку земји каде што работиме во Европа – главно во средна, јужна и источна Европа – судовите се заглавени со огромен број на заостанати предмети од ваков вид. Сепак, некои од нивните соседи успеале да го решат проблемот. 

Зошто луѓето не плаќаат? Зошто некои земји се подобри во оваа работа од другите?  И што може да се направи за да се подобрат системите за наплата на долговите?

What happens if you don’t pay your bill? Lessons from Central and Eastern Europe

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: Македонски


We all have regular bills to pay for the ubiquitous services we consume – whether they be for utilities (water, heating, electricity etc.), credit cards, memberships, or car payments.  But, not everyone pays.  

So why don’t people pay?  Why are some countries better at this than others?  And what can be done to improve systems for debt collection?

The economic benefits of LGBTI inclusion

Georgia Harley's picture
Civil Rights Defenders/Photo: Vesna Lalic
Civil Rights Defenders/Photo: Vesna Lalic
Discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people is an all too familiar story. Members of this community are frequent targets of violence and other human rights abuses, and often face prejudice and hardship at work, in their communities, and at home.

Action is needed to address these problems and ensure that everyone – regardless of race, gender, age, sexual orientation, or gender identity - has an equal chance to live a healthy and prosperous life
This is not only the right thing to do, it also makes economic sense: a growing body of evidence indicates that discrimination against LGBTI people has a negative economic impact on society.

Don’t sweat the small stuff – lessons from European courts

Georgia Harley's picture

Last year, we posted a blog – Resolving Minor Disputes Matters Big Time for the Poor – which highlighted how courts can fast-track minor disputes to deliver faster, cheaper and more appropriate justice and how – for the poor and for micro and small businesses – this may be their only path to justice. 

Increasingly, citizens and businesses demand fast-tracking services for small cases and, according to Doing Business data, 138 economies have a small claims procedure of some kind. So courts across the world are eager to learn how to roll out such reforms – either to introduce a fast track procedure or to improve on an existing one.

Assessing disaster risk in Europe and Central Asia – what did we learn?

Alanna Simpson's picture
Heavy rains on June 13-14, 2015 caused a 1 million cubic-meter landslide to flow down the Vere River valley and damage the capital city of Tbilisi, Georgia. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons)
Across the Europe and Central Asia region today, policymakers are confronted daily with a wide range of development challenges and decisions, but the potential impacts of adverse natural events and climate change – such as earthquakes or flooding – may not always be first and foremost in their thoughts.

Admittedly, the region does not face the same daunting disaster risks as some other parts of the world – especially in South Asia, East Asia and Latin America – but nevertheless, it is far from immune to the effects of natural hazards – as the past clearly reminds us.

To reinvigorate Europe, we need more integration… of services

Doerte Doemeland's picture
Also available in: Русский | Română


To reinvigorate growth in Europe, European Central Bank President Mario Draghi called for more common projects in the European Union (EU). And he emphasized that these efforts need to meet a set of minimum bars: they should “…focus on those actions that deliver tangible and immediately recognisable results… [they] should complement the actions of governments; they should be clearly linked to people’s immediate concerns; they should unequivocally concern matters of European or global significance.”

We couldn’t agree more.

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