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Croatia

Jeta në margjina: përvoja e personave LGBTI në Evropën Juglindore

Linda Van Gelder's picture
Also available in: English | Bosanski


Në Bankën Botërore, e dimë se përfshirja sociale nuk është vetëm gjëja e duhur, por edhe ekonomikisht gjëja më e mençur për ta bërë. Shoqëritë më përfshirëse kanë më shumë gjasa që ta shfrytëzojnë më së miri kapitalin njerëzor. Qytetet më të hapura dhe më përfshirëse kanë më shumë gjasa për ta tërhequr kapitalin dhe talentin ndërkombëtar. Shtetet më të hapura dhe më përfshirëse janë destinacione më tërheqëse për turistët ndërkombëtarë.

2,300 persona LGBTI nga Shqipëria, Bosnja dhe Hercegovina, Kroacia, Kosova, Ish Republika Jugosllave e Maqedonisë, Mali i Zi dhe Sllovenia i ndanë përvojat e tyre në anketën më të madh ndonjëherë të pakicave seksuale dhe gjinore në rajon. Raporti i hulumtimit “Jeta në margjina: Rezultatet e anketës lidhur me përvojat e personave LGBTI në Evropën Juglindore” ofron një përshkrim të hollësishëm të përgjigjeve dhe tregon një histori të diskriminimit, të përjashtimit dhe të dhunës.

Život na margini: Iskustva LGBTI osoba u jugoistočnoj Evropi

Linda Van Gelder's picture
Also available in: English | Shqip


Mi u Svjetskoj banci smo svjesni da je socijalna inkluzija, ne samo ispravan, već i ekonomski mudar, pristup. Što je društvo inkluzivnije, veća je vjerovatnoća da će bolje iskoristiti svoj cjelokupni ljudski kapital. Otvoreniji i inkluzivniji gradovi imaju veće šanse za privlačenje međunarodnog kapitala i talenata. Otvorenije i inkluzivnije države predstavljaju privlačnije međunarodne turističke destinacije.

2.300 LGBTI osoba iz Albanije, Bosne i Hercegovine, Hrvatske, s Kosova, BJR Makedonije, Crne Gore i Slovenije je iznijelo svoja iskustva u, do sada najvećem, istraživanju  seksualnih i rodnih manjina u regiji. Izvještaj ovog istraživanja pod nazivom “Život na margini: Rezultati istraživanja iskustava LGBTI osoba u jugoistočnoj Evropi” daje detaljan prikaz odgovora i ukazuje na diskriminaciju, isključivanje i nasilje.

Life on the Margins: experiences of LGBTI people in southeastern Europe

Linda Van Gelder's picture
Also available in: Bosanski | Shqip


At the World Bank, we know that social inclusion is not only the right thing but also the economically smart thing to do. More inclusive societies are more likely to make the most of their entire stock of human capital. More open and inclusive cities are better placed to attract international capital and talent. More open and inclusive countries make more attractive international tourist destinations.

2,300 LGBTI people from Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, FYR Macedonia, Montenegro, and Slovenia shared their experiences in the largest-ever survey of sexual and gender minorities in the region. The research report “Life on the Margins: Survey Results of the Experiences of LGBTI People in Southeastern Europe” provides a detailed account of the responses and tells a story of discrimination, exclusion, and violence.

Working Across Borders to Improve Early Warnings in South Eastern Europe

Daniel Werner Kull's picture

A massive storm system brought historic flooding across South Eastern Europe in 2014, causing more than $2 billion in damages in Bosnia and Herzegovina and shrinking Serbia’s economy by nearly a full percent. Two years later, in August 2016, thunderstorms in the Former Yugoslav Republic (FYR) of Macedonia dropped 93 liters of precipitation per square meter in just a few hours, sparking flash floods in the capital, Skopje, that killed at least 21 people.
 
In both cases, some of these impacts could have been reduced by improving cross-border monitoring and forecasting while strengthening early warning services at a national level. Fortunately, governments are now working together to improve information exchanges across boundaries and strengthening regional early warning systems through the South-East European Multi-Hazard Early Warning Advisory System.

How do courts impact the business climate… really?

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: Русский
Tim Cordell, Cartoonstock.com

We know that the justice system dampens the business climate in many of the countries where we work. In Bank reports, national strategies, and in common parlance, we lament that poorly performing courts delay business activity, undermine predictability, increase risks and constrain private sector growth. Going further, we conclude that weak justice systems disproportionately hamper micro, small and medium sized enterprises (MSMEs) because they have less buffer to absorb these problems - which can become make-or-break for their businesses.

So that’s the ‘what’ but, precisely, how, do courts impact businesses?
 

E-justice: does electronic court reporting improve court performance?

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: Română


More and more courts are going digital. But does this improve judicial performance?
 
Legal literature on ‘e-justice’ seems to think so. So too does the World Development Report, ‘Digital Dividends,’ which highlights the potential for ICT to improve the transparency and quality of government service delivery.
 
As electronic court reporting is one key aspect of this trend, we want to take the opportunity to look at the pros and cons of improving judicial performance in different contexts.

E-justiţia: Poate înregistrarea electronică a materialelor procedurale îmbunătăţi performanța instanţelor?

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: English


More and more courts are going digital. But does this improve judicial performance?
 
Legal literature on ‘e-justice’ seems to think so. So too does the World Development Report, ‘Digital Dividends,’ which highlights the potential for ICT to improve the transparency and quality of government service delivery.
 
As electronic court reporting is one key aspect of this trend, we want to take the opportunity to look at the pros and cons of improving judicial performance in different contexts.

A Toast to Food: Looking for innovation in Croatia’s food industry

Also available in: Русский
Innovation in food may seem obscure. There are only so many ways you can cut a carrot and you cannot simply reinvent the pig. But in an increasingly busy and wealthy world, the nature of demand for food is changing and scope exists for innovation in the way we deliver food to match people’s lifestyles. With demand for such new segments rapidly growing across Europe, Croatia seems well-poised to exploit this trend.

So why aren’t more farmers and firms champing at the bit to get a piece of this economic pie?



 

Што се случува ако не ја платите својата сметка? Извлечени поуки од централна и источна Европа

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: English


Сите ние имаме редовни сметки за плаќање за сеприсутните услуги кои ги трошиме – било да се работи за комунални услуги (вода, затоплување, електрична енергија итн.), кредитни картички, членства или отплати за автомобили.  Но, не сите ги плаќаат своите сметки.

Во целата економија овие неплатени сметки се претвораат во милиони предмети за извршување од мала вредност, кои честопати се неспорни. На економијата ѝ е потребен систем кој брзо, евтино и првично може да се справи со ваквиот долг.  Доколку системот за наплата на долгови потфрли тоа доведува до низа системски проблеми кои постепено ги задушуваат како судовите така и целата економија. 

Во неколку земји каде што работиме во Европа – главно во средна, јужна и источна Европа – судовите се заглавени со огромен број на заостанати предмети од ваков вид. Сепак, некои од нивните соседи успеале да го решат проблемот. 

Зошто луѓето не плаќаат? Зошто некои земји се подобри во оваа работа од другите?  И што може да се направи за да се подобрат системите за наплата на долговите?

What happens if you don’t pay your bill? Lessons from Central and Eastern Europe

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: Македонски


We all have regular bills to pay for the ubiquitous services we consume – whether they be for utilities (water, heating, electricity etc.), credit cards, memberships, or car payments.  But, not everyone pays.  

So why don’t people pay?  Why are some countries better at this than others?  And what can be done to improve systems for debt collection?

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