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Private Sector Development

When managers do not know that they do not know

Josefina Posadas's picture
Also available in: Bosanski


Being a labor economist by training, thinking about the skills of jobseekers, workers in the changing world of labor and students is an integral part of my everyday work-life and part of my ongoing dialog with policy makers and academics.

But what about the skills of employers? Do managers and CEOs have the skills needed to make firms grow and succeed in integrated global markets and complex business environments? 

Kad menadžeri ne znaju da ne znaju

Josefina Posadas's picture
Also available in: English

Obzirom da sam ekonomista rada, razmišljanje o vještinama onih koji traže posao, radnicima i studentima u svijetu rada koji se mijenja, predstavlja sastavni dio moje radne svakodnevnice i dio dijaloga kojeg vodim sa kreatorima politika i akademskom zajednicom.   

Ali šta je sa vještinama poslodavaca?

Da li menadžeri i izvršni direktori posjeduju potrebne vještine da bi omogućili rast firmi i njihov uspjeh u integriranim globalnim tržištima i složenim poslovnim okruženjima? I što je takođe jako važno, da li imaju vještine za maksimalno iskorištavanje potencijala za rast koje bi mogle dovesti do otvaranja radnih mjesta?

Higher education institutions as drivers of innovation and growth in Azerbaijan

Igor Kheyfets's picture
Also available in: Русский
Azerbaijan Education

It’s a cold spring day in Baku, and several students from Azerbaijan State Oil and Industry University (ASOIU) are huddled around a laptop trying to project an image onto their classroom wall.
 
Once the image is projected, one of the students “writes” on the surface of the classroom wall – as he would on the computer screen – using customized software called CamTouch, which allows the user to turn any surface into an interactive “smartboard”. The student also selects an icon and virtually opens a document with the help of a special stylus.

Growth in Central Asia hinges on creating more jobs with higher wages

Lilia Burunciuc's picture
Also available in: Русский


Jobs and wage growth have been the most important driver of poverty reduction globally, and Central Asia. In Tajikistan, for example, it has cut poverty by about two-thirds since 2003. In Kazakhstan, it accounted for more than three-quarters of income growth over the past decade — even among the poorest 20 percent. The other Central Asian nations have also achieved significant economic growth and poverty reduction in the past two decades due to income growth.

But poverty-reduction rates have slowed. In Kyrgyzstan, they began slowing during the global recession of 2008, as income growth faltered. Poverty reduction in Tajikistan leveled off in 2015, when wage growth slackened and remittances from Tajiks working overseas fell.

In Uzbekistan, more than 90 percent of the poorest households have identified lack of jobs as their most urgent priority. For these families, the prospect of increasing their income is slim, while the likelihood of transmitting poverty to their children is high.

So what should countries in Central Asian do to build on their past achievements and prepare their citizens for the jobs of the future?

How do courts impact the business climate… really?

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: Русский
Tim Cordell, Cartoonstock.com

We know that the justice system dampens the business climate in many of the countries where we work. In Bank reports, national strategies, and in common parlance, we lament that poorly performing courts delay business activity, undermine predictability, increase risks and constrain private sector growth. Going further, we conclude that weak justice systems disproportionately hamper micro, small and medium sized enterprises (MSMEs) because they have less buffer to absorb these problems - which can become make-or-break for their businesses.

So that’s the ‘what’ but, precisely, how, do courts impact businesses?
 

Doing Business and Central Asia – After 15 years, how much reform?

Stefka Slavova's picture
Also available in: Русский


This year, the annual Doing Business Report – by far the most anticipated and cited World Bank publication – celebrates its 15th year. Starting in 2003, the fledgling report, which covers about 130 countries, has grown into its teens garnering admiration and criticism in equal measure. Some absolutely love it, while others argue that its flaws outweigh its strong points.

Regardless, nobody can deny that the Doing Business report has been a major catalyst for reforms across the world – 3,200 reforms of business regulation have been counted to date, spurred by the Report and carried out in line with the methodology of its indicators.

Што се случува ако не ја платите својата сметка? Извлечени поуки од централна и источна Европа

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: English


Сите ние имаме редовни сметки за плаќање за сеприсутните услуги кои ги трошиме – било да се работи за комунални услуги (вода, затоплување, електрична енергија итн.), кредитни картички, членства или отплати за автомобили.  Но, не сите ги плаќаат своите сметки.

Во целата економија овие неплатени сметки се претвораат во милиони предмети за извршување од мала вредност, кои честопати се неспорни. На економијата ѝ е потребен систем кој брзо, евтино и првично може да се справи со ваквиот долг.  Доколку системот за наплата на долгови потфрли тоа доведува до низа системски проблеми кои постепено ги задушуваат како судовите така и целата економија. 

Во неколку земји каде што работиме во Европа – главно во средна, јужна и источна Европа – судовите се заглавени со огромен број на заостанати предмети од ваков вид. Сепак, некои од нивните соседи успеале да го решат проблемот. 

Зошто луѓето не плаќаат? Зошто некои земји се подобри во оваа работа од другите?  И што може да се направи за да се подобрат системите за наплата на долговите?

What happens if you don’t pay your bill? Lessons from Central and Eastern Europe

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: Македонски


We all have regular bills to pay for the ubiquitous services we consume – whether they be for utilities (water, heating, electricity etc.), credit cards, memberships, or car payments.  But, not everyone pays.  

So why don’t people pay?  Why are some countries better at this than others?  And what can be done to improve systems for debt collection?

Moldova – Ce urmează?

Alex Kremer's picture
Also available in: English | Русский
Road menders in MoldovaDupă o pauză de doi ani, Banca Mondială a oferit Republicii Moldova suportul bugetar atât de necesar în noiembrie 2016. Această plată de 45 milioane de dolari SUA a reflectat încrederea noastră, că Guvernul și Banca Națională gestionau, într-un final, circumstanțele care au determinat, prin intermediul unei fraude scandaloase, pierderea a unei optimi din venitul anual al Republicii Moldova.

Totuși, asistența oferită Republicii Moldova pentru stabilizarea crizei economice reprezintă doar debutul creșterii economiei și al îmbunătățirii vieții oamenilor. Deci, unde ar trebui să fie concentrate acum eforturile?

Moldova – What’s next?

Alex Kremer's picture
Also available in: Русский | Română
Road menders in MoldovaAfter a two-year hiatus, the World Bank provided much-needed budget support to Moldova in November 2016. That disbursement of $45 million reflected our confidence that the Government and the National Bank were at last dealing with the conditions that had previously lost – in a scandalous fraud – one eight of Moldova’s yearly income.

Helping Moldova to stabilize an economic crisis, however, is only the beginning of growing the economy and improving people’s lives. So, where should we focus our efforts now?

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