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Quit smoking – not only good for your health, but also for your wallet!

Cesar A. Cancho's picture
Also available in: Bosanski


It is a foggy afternoon in Sarajevo and the sound of the bell signals the end of classes for the day. The engineering school students rush out of the building, and while most scatter in different directions, some of them head to a kiosk nearby.

Women and employment in Albania’s construction sector – Closing the gender gap

Nato Kurshitashvili's picture
Also available in: Shqip
A road construction engineer, Albania

New infrastructure projects typically see an increase in demand for labor and skills, thereby creating new employment opportunities in the construction sector. In Albania, several infrastructure projects currently being implemented are good news for the country’s economy – but they also provide an opportunity to boost participation of women in a largely male-dominated sector. According to our research, the share of women currently employed in Albania’s construction sector is just 3%.
 

When managers do not know that they do not know

Josefina Posadas's picture
Also available in: Bosanski


Being a labor economist by training, thinking about the skills of jobseekers, workers in the changing world of labor and students is an integral part of my everyday work-life and part of my ongoing dialog with policy makers and academics.

But what about the skills of employers? Do managers and CEOs have the skills needed to make firms grow and succeed in integrated global markets and complex business environments? 

A Tale of Three Friends: Urban planning and why it matters for Polish development

Marcel Ionescu-Heroiu's picture
Everyone who knows spatial planning has heard this famous quote of Socrates: “By far the greatest and most admirable form of wisdom is that needed to plan and beautify cities and human communities.”
 
Socrates was right. Urban planning matters greatly for development - it impacts regulations, construction, economic growth, and the everyday lives of people. Currently, the World Bank and the European Commission are working with the Polish municipality of Rzeszów to improve urban planning and beautify this economic and cultural center in south-eastern Poland.

The distance between skills and jobs in Moldova

Boris Ciobanu's picture
Also available in: Русский | Română


Walking my dog recently, early on a dark January morning, I noticed a light from a window on the ground floor of the school near my home. I took a peek inside. Somebody was preparing the classroom for a technology education lesson, or what we call in this part of the world a “labor lesson.”

I am not nostalgic by nature, but the sight of the classroom took my mind back to the Moldova of the mid-1980s. That’s when I used to attend such classes.

Backhaul to the future – Can digital technology make Central Asia’s agriculture competitive?

Julian Lampietti's picture
Shutterstock Photo

Whether matching drivers with riders or landlords with lodgers, digital platforms like Uber and AirBnB push the marginal cost of matching supply and demand to an unprecedented low. Large infrastructure projects like China’s One Belt, One Road Initiative - which aims at more closely linking the two ends of Eurasia, as well as Africa and Oceania - could create an opportunity to alter the future of Central Asia’s agriculture, if food supply and demand can be matched more efficiently.

Higher education institutions as drivers of innovation and growth in Azerbaijan

Igor Kheyfets's picture
Azerbaijan Education

It’s a cold spring day in Baku, and several students from Azerbaijan State Oil and Industry University (ASOIU) are huddled around a laptop trying to project an image onto their classroom wall.
 
Once the image is projected, one of the students “writes” on the surface of the classroom wall – as he would on the computer screen – using customized software called CamTouch, which allows the user to turn any surface into an interactive “smartboard”. The student also selects an icon and virtually opens a document with the help of a special stylus.

What will Croatia’s soccer players do next?

Maciej Drozd's picture
Photo: Drusany/Shutterstock
The 2018 World Cup brought fame to the Croatian team, with many fans around the world – including the author of this blog - rooting for the team in white-and-red checkerboard jerseys. For the players on the Croatian national team, the success they found on the field should also pay off financially, thanks to prize money, higher pay, and advertising revenues.
 
But the stories of the top-earning soccer stars living a glamorous life of wealth tend to make us forget that most athletes are not wealthy enough to retire when their careers end and find themselves facing the same challenges as everyone else looking to change professions.
 

I believe Belarus will benefit greatly from the Human Capital Index – Here’s why

Alex Kremer's picture
Also available in: Русский


On 11 October 2018, the World Bank launched its Human Capital Index, which quantifies the contribution of health and education to the productivity of the next generation of workers. The Index is part of the Human Capital Project, a global effort to accelerate more and better investments in people. Belarus didn’t participate in the Index this year.

Back in 1440, King Henry VI of England founded a college for poor scholars, providing a free education for boys whose families couldn’t afford to pay. At that time, the young students learned to read and write so that they could later work as administrators in the royal court.

A few centuries later, in 1977, I became one of “King Henry’s scholars”. I’m not working for a king, of course, but I recognize how lucky I am to have benefited from Henry’s medieval investment in human capital. One could perhaps call him a “very early adopter”.

These days, investing in people makes more economic sense than ever. Human capital – the knowledge, skills, and health that people accumulate throughout their lives – accounts for up to 68% of a country’s overall wealth, on average. In the case of Belarus, where I now live, the share of human capital in the country’s total wealth is somewhat lower, at 49.2%.

After three decades of transformation in Georgia – what’s next for the jobs market?

Florentin Kerschbaumer's picture
Georgia Job Market
Celebrating his 60th birthday recently, my father chatted with me about his career and getting his first job. He graduated as an engineer in the 1970s in Austria and faced very different employment opportunities to those I faced some decades later. There were five construction firms, all just around the corner from his home, to which he could apply for a job at that time.

When I finished graduate school in 2016, I applied for work with organizations in five different countries around the world. Suffice to say, the labor market in which my generation is competing is vastly different and far more globalized than the one my dad faced.

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