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More oil from old wells: Innovating for Kazakhstan’s future

Yeraly Beksultan's picture
Also available in: Русский
Although innovation has been a hot topic in Kazakhstan for over a decade now, it’s not always easy getting brilliant ideas “from the laboratory to the market.”
 
Kazakh scientists navigate this winding, unpredictable road for years and generally come to the realization that great scientific research is not enough in itself. Too often, they face a lack of support when it comes to applying the results of their scientific research in a useful, practical way.
 
Fortunately, a team of Kazakh scientists at the Private Entity Institute of Polymer Materials and Technology in Almaty has had a somewhat more positive experience. This team has been working on a truly innovative project: developing a solution to improving the recovery of oil from old oil wells in Kazakhstan.
 
But why, you might ask?

Residential sector reform: Ukraine at the crossroads

Grzegorz Gajda's picture
Reform of the residential and utilities sector in Ukraine is now imminent, as much as the modernization of law enforcement or reform of the public health care system. In fact, Ukrainians deal with these areas on a daily basis and, historically, reforms in the residential sector were usually postponed until better times. First, it is important to explain why Ukraine finds itself in this situation. After gaining independence, Ukraine received, among other things, a tremendous amount of state-owned residential property.
 

In Kazakhstan, every number counts

Aliya Pistayeva's picture
Also available in: Русский
Mark Twain once said: “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.” It might seem that not much has changed since then.

In Kazakhstan, however, we have tried to change this perception of statistics, starting with the KAZSTAT Project that was launched in 2013 to strengthen the national statistical system.

In aging societies, will young liberals become old conservatives?

Hernan Winkler's picture
The old saying goes, “If you’re not a liberal when you’re young, then you don’t have a heart - but if you haven’t become a conservative when you’re old, then you don’t have a brain.”

Scholars have long explored whether people’s opinions really change as they get older. This question is particularly relevant today for the aging economies of Europe, where the elderly are expected to reach 30 percent of the total population by 2050. And by 2030, the majority of voters will be 50 years or older in most countries of the region.
 
Elderly men, Serbia

Krijimi i besimit te qeveria

Jana Kunicova's picture
Teksti i mesazhit që qeveria u dërgon qytetarëve në përpjekje për të parandaluar korrupsionin.
Qytetarët shqiptarë që kohët e fundit kanë marrë shërbim në një spital shtetëror kanë gjasa të marrin një tekst mesazhi në celular që shkruan pak a shumë kështu: “Përshëndetje, unë jam Bledi Cuci, Ministër Shteti për Anti-Korrupsionin. Të dhënat tona tregojnë se kohët e fundit ju keni marrë shërbim në një spital shtetëror. A mund të më thoni, ju lutem, nëse ju është kërkuar të paguani ryshfet? Përgjigjja është falas. Faleminderit për kohën”. (English Version)



 

Russia's recovery? In the long term, it depends on structural reforms

Birgit Hansl's picture
Also available in: Русский
2015 is set to be a year of recession for Russia – with economic growth likely to come out somewhere between -2 and -4 percent.

The latest World Bank forecast for June projects a 2.7 percent contraction (based on an oil price of US$ 58 per barrel), which has been revised up from 3.8 percent (based on US$ 53 per barrel).

Is the region ready for the next big one?

Joaquin Toro's picture

By now everybody is witnessing the devastating consequences of the 7.8 magnitude (Richter scale) earthquake in Nepal. According to the latest figures, more than 7,000 people have died and more than 10,000 have been injured. These numbers are likely to increase as the authorities and relief agencies reach more remote locations.

In light of this event we asked ourselves a series of questions for our region:

When will the next catastrophic earthquake hit?
Where will it be?
Is it going to be in East Europe and Central Asia (ECA) region?
Are we prepared for it?


The answers to these questions are both simple and complex.

Unlocking Georgia’s potential through export-led job creation

Rashmi Shankar's picture
Having lived in Tbilisi for almost three years now, I continue to be fascinated by the contradictions of the Georgian story.

On one hand, Georgia has achieved significant economic growth over the past decade, successfully introduced much needed governance reform, and become synonymous with world leadership in terms of doing business (ranked in the top 15 and better than some OECD countries).

On the other hand, the country has been dogged persistently by high poverty rates – among the highest in the Europe and Central Asia region. And, despite a highly improved business environment, unemployment rates remain in the double digits: official unemployment is currently around 15 percent!

Developing a 360 degree view of poverty in Armenia

Nistha Sinha's picture

How can we better understand and reach Armenia’s poor? This is a question that my colleagues and I, along with Armenia’s National Statistical Service (NSS) are asking, as we ponder the experiences of several countries in Latin America and the Caribbean who have moved past simply looking at incomes, and instead used a multidimensional approach to poverty measurement.

How long is too long? When justice delayed is justice denied

Georgia Harley's picture
As the saying goes, ‘justice delayed is justice denied.’ Yet, across the world, court users complain that the courts take too long. For your regular court user facing endless talk from lawyers, reams of paper, and mounting legal bills, a court case can feel like it goes on…FOR….EV….ER.
 
But how long is too long? The question has arisen on each of my last four missions in as many months – from Kenya to Croatia to Serbia and back.
 
And it’s not a rhetorical question. Answers can assist client countries in analyzing their efficiency and devising reforms that improve both timeliness and user satisfaction. It also enables potential court users to better estimate how long it might take to resolve their dispute – allowing them to then adjust their expectations accordingly.
 
After all, better enabling people and businesses to resolve their disputes contributes to poverty reduction and shared prosperity.
 

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