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Climate Change

Working Across Borders to Improve Early Warnings in South Eastern Europe

Daniel Werner Kull's picture

A massive storm system brought historic flooding across South Eastern Europe in 2014, causing more than $2 billion in damages in Bosnia and Herzegovina and shrinking Serbia’s economy by nearly a full percent. Two years later, in August 2016, thunderstorms in the Former Yugoslav Republic (FYR) of Macedonia dropped 93 liters of precipitation per square meter in just a few hours, sparking flash floods in the capital, Skopje, that killed at least 21 people.
 
In both cases, some of these impacts could have been reduced by improving cross-border monitoring and forecasting while strengthening early warning services at a national level. Fortunately, governments are now working together to improve information exchanges across boundaries and strengthening regional early warning systems through the South-East European Multi-Hazard Early Warning Advisory System.

Proaktivan pristup u hvatanju ukoštac sa klimatskim ekstremima u Srbiji

Darko Milutin's picture
Also available in: English | Русский


Žestok i dugotrajni talas vrućina je ovog leta pogodio dobar deo centralne Evrope, uzrokujući deformacije šina na prugama u Srbiji i primoravajući najmanje 10 zemalja da proglase crveni meteoalarm zbog opasnosti po zdravlje stanovništva i štednje vode. Nekada retka neprijatnost, ekstremne vremenske pojave kao što je ova postaju sve uobičajenije u čitavom regionu – i sve opasnije.

Ovi izazovi su podstakli Vladu Srbije da tokom poslednjih nekoliko godina usvoji aktivan pristup građenju otpornosti na klimatske rizike i rizike od katastrofa.

Taking a proactive approach to climate extremes in Serbia

Darko Milutin's picture
Also available in: Српски | Русский

A severe and prolonged heat wave stifled much of Central Europe this summer, buckling train tracks in Serbia and forcing at least 10 countries to issue red alerts for health concerns and water conservation. Once a rare nuisance, extreme weather events like this are becoming more commonplace throughout the region – and more dangerous.

These challenges have prompted the government of Serbia to take a proactive approach to building resilience to climate and disaster risks over the last few years.