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These three countries significantly increased women parliamentarians

Ravi Kumar's picture

Many countries around the world are working to improve women representation in the government.

If you look at the data from the last 25 years to see which countries made significant progress to increase proportion of seats held by women in their national parliaments, these three countries will stand out!
 
Rwanda, Bolivia and South Africa! See the chart below. 



On this International Women’s Day, let’s quickly look at how these countries increased the proportion of women in parliaments.

Rwanda:
 
In 1990, only 17% of Rwanda’s parliament was held by women, according to the Inter-Parliamentary Union. Today, 25 years later, 64% of parliament is occupied by women.

Development as Freedom in a Digital Age: join us for the book launch event on April 9

Soren Gigler's picture

Cover of Development as Freedom in a Digital Age Book

The majority of the poor in the world are gaining access to these technologies for the first time. The real question remains: does having access to a cell phone, the Internet, or social media have any tangible benefits for the living conditions of the most marginalized among the poor?
 
Is the “digital divide” widening or narrowing the “economic divide”? Today being digital literate has become imperative for accessing economic, social, and political opportunities.

Five ways technology is improving public services

Ravi Kumar's picture

If you live in a country where electricity never or rarely goes out, you are lucky. In my country, Nepal, we are pleased when we get uninterrupted electricity for even eight hours a day.

Like Nepal, many countries around the world struggle to deliver basic services to their citizens. But things are slowly improving.Here are five examples of how technology is improving public services.

1. Participatory budgeting

Community health worker at the Marechal Health Center
Photo Credit: Dominic Chavez/World Bank

In the Democratic Republic of Congo, citizens of South Kivu Province are using “mSurvey” to obtain information about budget meetings. Using just their mobile phones, they can actively monitor, discover what was decided at meetings, and evaluate those decisions via online voting. The Participatory Budgeting project encourages accountability by actively reminding local authorities of their commitments while ensuring that citizens are getting services they deserve.