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Anti-Corruption Day

Here are 10 ways to fight corruption

Robert Hunja's picture


1. Corruption is not only about bribes: People especially the poor get hurt when resources are wasted. That’s why it is so important to understand the different kinds of corruption to develop smart responses. 
 
2. Power of the people: Create pathways that give citizens relevant tools to engage and participate in their governments – identify priorities,  problems and find solutions.
 
3. Cut the red tape: Bring together formal and informal processes (this means working with the government as well as  non-governmental groups) to change behavior and monitor progress.

Six Charts on How Corruption Impacts Firms Worldwide

Ravi Kumar's picture

At times, I ask my friends in Nepal, why they would not launch a business, especially when they have funds. A common obstacle for everyone is that they say you have to bribe government officials to even open a business.
 
Turns out, this isn’t unique to Nepal. According to Drivers of Corruption, a report recently published by the World Bank, developing countries are generally more affected by corruption than other countries.

Here are six charts that show firms’ experiences with corruption around the world. These charts are based on surveys of more than 13,000 firms in 135 countries, by World Bank Enterprise Surveys.

Check out these charts and tell us if you are surprised. 

How Would You #TakeOn Corruption and Promote Good Governance?

Ravi Kumar's picture
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Corruption greatly undermines government effectiveness.
Source: futureatlas.com

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On a hot dry day in June, a woman in her early 40s is getting ready for journey to a nearby town. She is excited even though she will walk more than three hours on foot—she is going to meet with a government loan officer to try to get the money she needs to buy fertilizer and other supplies for her farm. She needs to grow and sell enough crops to pay for her son to continue school for the next year.
 
She gets a mug of water from a bucket to put out the open wood fire that she uses to cook meals for her family. Then she pulls her slippers from the thatched roof and leaves her hut.
 
As she walks, she feels hopeful. She believes this loan will change her family’s future. For the past 6 months, she has made numerous trips to this office because the government official had told her that before her application could be considered, the paperwork must be accurate and complete.