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Bank supports launch of certificate course on contractual dispute resolution in India

Shanker Lal's picture
Powerlines in Mumbai. Photo: Simone D. McCourtie / World Bank


India is the fastest-growing major economy in the world with significant Government investments in infrastructure. According to estimates by WTO and OECD, as quoted in a report from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, India: Probity in Public Procurement, the estimated public procurement in India is between 20 and 30 percent of GDP. 

This translates to Indian government agencies issuing contracts worth an estimated US$ 419 billion to US$ 628 billion each year for various aspects of infrastructure projects. Ideally, in contractual agreements no disputes would arise and both sides would benefit from the outcome. However, unexpected events occur and many contracts end in dispute. Contractual legal disputes devoid project benefits to the public as time and resources are spent in expensive arbitration and litigation. As a result, India’s development goals are impacted.

From Ronaldo and Buffon to teamwork: what finance ministries can learn from the beautiful game

Mario Marcel's picture
South Africa is steadily preparing for the 2010 Soccer World Cup while the enthusiasm at ground level builds. Photo: © John Hogg/World Bank

If you were a football (soccer) player, who would you be? Representatives of Ministries of Finance from 20 African countries were confronted with this question at a CABRI-sponsored conference in Johannesburg last April.

Engaging governments to increase their capacity: lessons from Tajikistan

Oleksii Balabushko's picture
Pomegranate farm. Tajikistan. Photo: Gennadiy Ratushenko / World Bank

 In 2010-14, we were facing a challenging task: develop a new approach to increase institutional and leadership capacity in Tajikistan’s public sector, including internal capability to initiate reforms. 

How do you build government capacity in a low income fragile state  in a way that would fit with the country context?

If you are familiar with the Western part of the former Soviet Union and have never been to Tajikistan, you are in for a surprise. The differences with countries such as Ukraine or Georgia are staggering.  To put things in the global perspective, Tajikistan has a GDP per capita lower than Cameroon, Djibouti and Papua New Guinea. The country suffered a civil war that lasted five years (1992-1997), resulted in massive internal displacement and decimated civil service. Despite establishing formal governing institutions after the war, institutional capacity remains weak.