Syndicate content

World Bank Procurement Framework

Is public procurement a rich country’s policy?

Simeon Djankov's picture
Kazakhstan. Photo: Kubat Sydykov / World Bank

How large is the share of public procurement to GDP in middle-income and low-income countries and how it is evolving? If sizable, can public procurement be used as a policy tool to make markets more competitive, and thus improve the quality of government services? Can it be used to induce innovation in firms? Can it also be a significant way to reduce corruption?

​6 things to know about the new World Bank Procurement Framework

Ravi Kumar's picture
Available in ArabicChinese. French and Spanish
School children in Lebanon. Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank

Students in public schools without textbooks at the start of the year. Health centers in villages without even the most basic medications. Oftentimes procurement is to blame.

An efficient procurement system isn't just a good idea, it's a necessary tool for all governments (local and national) to function properly and deliver public services.

Keeping pace with global trends, on July 1 the World Bank will roll out the new Procurement Framework for countries that procure goods and services under Bank-finance projects. The new framework will be implemented for all investment projects with a Project Concept Note on or after July 1, 2016.  Led by the Global Governance Practice (GGP) with support from Operations Policy and Country Services (OPCS), the framework is designed to increase flexibility, efficiency, and transparency of procurement process, to better meet the needs of client countries.

So, what will the World Bank's new Procurement Framework do?