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Law and Regulation

Beyond Courts: Using a justice lens to address conflict, fragility and violence

Hassane Cisse's picture
Gaza. Displaced Persons. World Bank
Gaza. Displaced persons. Photo: © Natalia Cieslik / World Bank

From civil wars in Mali and Iraq to urban crime in Central America, perceptions of injustice are central to fueling violence and fragility. While we in the development community increasingly recognize that legitimate and effective justice institutions are crucial to inclusive growth in these contexts, we have often struggled to support them. The World Bank is at the forefront of developing new ways of understanding justice challenges as well as practical means to address them. 

A panel on “New Approaches to Justice in FCV,” part of the 2015 Fragility Forum, highlighted new ways of understanding and responding to justice challenges.

The growing popularity of justice impact evaluations in developing countries

Nicholas Menzies's picture
Source: billsonPHOTO 


I was lucky to recently attend a workshop on justice and governance impact evaluations in the wonderful city of Istanbul. The spark of the workshop discussions lived up to the liveliness of the location.

Some time ago I blogged about the pros and cons of impact evaluations for justice projects in developing countries.  Since then, interest in impact evaluations in the justice sector has grown at the World Bank and within the larger development community. 

Justice proposed for sustainable development goals

Heike Gramckow's picture
​Source UN, 2014. The Road to Dignity by 2030: Ending Poverty, Transforming All Lives and Protecting the Planet

This year will see a major milestone with the adoption of sustainable development goals (SDGs) by the UN’s member states. Expanding on the 8 Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set in 2000, the currently envisioned 17 SDGs are aiming to address broader, transformative economic, environmental and social changes. For the first time, however, the centrality of justice in achieving sustainable development has been recognized in the Open Working Group’s proposed Goal 16:
 
Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels.
 
The mention of justice, governance and peaceful societies in the SDGs is seen as an important step, but one that will pose many challenges. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon has put his support behind the inclusion of justice as a central pillar for achieving sustainable development.

New Directions in Governance

Mario Marcel's picture

In my first mission as senior director, I am participating in an event in London this week hosted by the Governance Partnership Facility (GPF). This multi donor trust fund includes the World Bank Group, along with donors that include the UK, Netherlands, Norway and Australia. This year’s program includes perspectives from civil society and academic institutions which will further enrich our understanding of what’s important to our client countries.

Despite relatively modest resources over the past five years the GPF has played a major role in helping to build the Bank’s Governance and Anti-Corruption strategy.  The model of the trust fund is structured around four different “windows” in which competitive grant proposals are submitted by World Bank task team leaders across the different Practice Groups; these are then carefully vetted and submitted to a Steering Committee for approval.

Are impact evaluations useful for justice reforms in developing countries?

Nicholas Menzies's picture

I have been somewhat skeptical about the application of impact evaluations to justice reform activities but I’m coming around to their utility for a limited – yet important – set of questions. The basic method behind impact evaluations – establishing a counterfactual in order to attribute net impact – is fairly new to justice so I thought I’d set out some ideas that might be worth considering in developing this nascent field.

A role for justice in poverty alleviation: The World Bank’s new strategy for justice reform

Christina Biebesheimer's picture

We know justice matters in development. Barriers to access to justice are a central dimension of poverty and an effective justice system is essential in ensuring a capable and accountable state. Across the world people strive to live in fair societies, where power is not exercised arbitrarily and fundamental rights are respected. 

More room for social accountability in the justice sector?

Nicholas Menzies's picture

In many areas of contemporary development practice–from the formulation of local budgets to the delivery of education services–social accountability mechanisms are being employed to assist citizens in holding the state accountable and thus, hopefully, to improve development outcomes.

Defining our path to the 'Rule of Law'

Lisa Bhansali's picture

Strengthening the Rule of Law (ROL) has been and remains an important element of the Bank's development agenda in response to the needs of our clients and beneficiaries. Unlike in years past, today, the Bank is being called on to support ROL in many different contexts and for different reasons.{C}

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