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Corruption, Politics and Public Service Reform in the Digital Age

Tina George Karippacheril's picture

//jenniferbussell.com/research/Last week, we invited Jennifer Bussell from UC Berkeley to present her fascinating study on corruption, politics and public service reforms in the digital age. The study is based in India and draws on a wealth of qualitative and quantitative data collected in 2009 from 20 subnational states, investigating how pre-existing institutional conditions influence e-Governance reforms.
 
Public service reforms in the digital age constitute a new era of relations between the citizen and the state. However, scholars have argued that much of the discourse on e-Government has been normative, with fairly optimistic predictions, and wanting deeper moorings in public management theory (Coursey & Norris, 2008; Heeks & Bailur, 2007; Yildiz, 2007).

Thinking politically about the role of MSIs in Governance

Brendan Halloran's picture

The recent rapid expansion of multi-stakeholders initiatives (MSI) promoting improved governance raises critical questions about the role of these mechanisms in addressing problems of government transparency, responsiveness, and accountability, specifically whether and how they generate on-the-ground impact.

HOW DO WE THINK MSIs CONTRIBUTE TO CHANGE?  MSIs, like other efforts to promote change, are built around a theory of change (TOC) about how they will contribute to the achievement of their goals.  These proposed causal pathways may be explicitly stated or implicit.  How do MSIs in the governance sphere articulate their role in contributing to change?  Do they base their theories of change on questionable assumptions, or lack a change hypothesis altogether?  TOCs also reflect a specific understanding of the challenge they seek to address.  It should not be surprising that a technical framing of governance problems would lead to a technocratic approach to a solution.  For example, the framing in OGP of ‘open’ government, with little explicit emphasis on democratic governance, may contribute to an emphasis on open data, e-government, and other technical aspects of governance, which are unlikely to address the core political dynamics that underlie governance deficits.

Holding a Mirror to the Governance Partnership Facility (GPF): $89 Million Multi-Donor Trust Fund Releases Annual Report

Petrus Henricus Van Heesewijk's picture

Click on image to read the report.The Governance Partnership Facility (GPF), a multi-donor trust fund, has released its 2013 Annual Report. The GPF was created in 2008 as a partnership between the World Bank and leading donors from the UK, Australia, Norway, and the Netherlands, in the field of governance with the aim of facilitating the implementation of the Bank’s Governance and Anti-Corruption (GAC) strategy.

La technologie suffit-elle à garantir la transparence budgétaire et l'ouverture? Les leçons tirées en Asie de l'Est et en Afrique du Nord

Tina George Karippacheril's picture

Les 6 et 7 mai 2014, l'Indonésie a accueilli la conférence régionale du Partenariat pour un  gouvernement ouvert (OGP) à Bali, une étape importante dans sa présidence de l'OGP. Autour des thèmes mobilisateurs de l'innovation, de l'ouverture et de la participation citoyenne, la transparence budgétaire, et notamment sa mise en œuvre par le biais de la technologie, est l'un des sujets dont les représentants des pouvoirs publics, de la société civile, des entreprises, des universités et des médias ont discuté.

I forgot facilitation! A reflection on the importance of dynamic, creative management of diverse actors in multi-stakeholder initiatives

Kate Bridges's picture

Participating in a multi-stakeholder initiative (MSI) sometimes feels rather more like duty than pleasure. As my eye travels around the room, it takes in the occasional snoozing civil society representative, the conspicuously empty chairs, and the combative government official languidly tapping on his blackberry. The meeting began an hour late after a straggler finally brought us to the necessary minimum number for a quorum. I find myself pondering, “Is this really working?” “Is this room of disparate stakeholders, with varying commitment and sundry objectives really going to solve one of Zambia’s most complex development challenges?”

Governance of the last resort? - When to consider a multi-stakeholder approach

Jonas Moberg's picture
And it should be realised that taking the initiative in introducing a new form of government is very difficult and dangerous, and unlikely to succeed. The reason is that the old order will be opposed to the innovator, whereas all those who might benefit from the new order are, at best, tepid supporters of him.”
 
Machiavelli, The Prince

A cult of "multi-stakeholderism"? - An attempt to clarify when a multistakeholder approach is useful and how it can be most effective.

Michael Jarvis's picture

"Multi-stakeholder" has become an established term in the international development lexicon. It is often inserted reflexively in proposals and reports, for example in association to broadening consultation, securing buy in, or strengthening oversight. The assumption is that being multi-stakeholder is a good thing. Fueling or at least reinforcing this trend has been the proliferation of formalized multi-stakeholder initiatives (MSIs) bringing together diverse actors from the public, private, and civil society sectors. This has certainly been true in the governance space over the past decade. The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, the Construction Sector Transparency Initiative, the Open Government Partnership, and the Open Contracting Partnership are just a few examples of MSIs that aim to solve governance problems through collective action. They build on a longer history of initiatives focused on particular social and environmental concerns, ranging from fair trade to sustainable sourcing of products.

PforRs look promising for Public Sector Operations, but are they asking too much?

William Dorotinsky's picture

Doctor speaking to parents of an infantAlmost two years ago Program for Results (PforR), the newest financing instrument for World Bank operations, was introduced to great expectations within the Bank and the international development community.

Pay differentials in public sector pay reform: Insights from HR professional practice

Willy McCourt's picture

//www.minorityjobs.netIntroduction: from compression ratios to pay differentials
 
In an earlier post we argued that, as a summary statistic, the compression ratio can direct us to aspects of public service pay and grading that we need to understand. That is, the target we have been shooting at with compression ratios is still worth hitting, even if our habitual prescriptions of decompression have fallen wide of the mark.

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