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South Asia

Clogged Metropolitan Arteries

Otaviano Canuto's picture

Bad conditions of mobility and accessibility to jobs and services in most metropolitan regions in developing countries are a key development issue. Besides the negative effects on the wellbeing of their populations associated with traffic congestion and time spent on transportation, the latter mean economic losses in terms of waste of human and material resources.

South Asia and the Geography of Poverty

Otaviano Canuto's picture

The world has become relatively less poor in the last few decades. People under conditions of extreme poverty -- that is, living on less than $1.25 per day -- have declined as a proportion of the world population, from 52 percent in 1981 to 22 percent in 2008.

Money Can’t Buy Equality

Otaviano Canuto's picture

South Asia has been one of the world’s success stories in terms of rapid economic growth. With India leading the way, South Asia’s poverty rate has fallen from 60 percent in 1981 to 40 percent in 2005. However, during the same period, the number of poor people—those living on less than $1.25 per day—actually increased from 549 million to 595 million over the same period.

The Next Wave of This Crisis

Raj Nallari's picture

After all is said and done, this crisis had its genesis in US and European countries living beyond their means. This was reflected in large current account deficit which was financed by emerging economies of China, Russia, Brazil, Korea and others.

The Service Revolution

Ihssane Loudiyi's picture

by Ejaz Ghani

China and India are both racing ahead economically. But the manner in which they are growing is dramatically different. Whereas China is a formidable exporter of manufactured goods, India has acquired a global reputation for exporting modern services. Indeed, India has leapfrogged over the manufacturing sector, going straight from agriculture into services.

Internet course: Trade Facilitation for Export Diversification in Small and Medium South Asian Countries

Ignacio Hernandez's picture

This one-week Internet course is targeted specifically at trade practitioners in small or medium South Asian countries (Afghanistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Sri-Lanka, Pakistan, and Maldives). Its goal is to provide useful insights and better understanding of trade facilitation, transit, and logistics constraints preventing optimal  export diversification in  those countries.

Course description

New blogs: End Poverty in South Asia / Paul Krugman

Ignacio Hernandez's picture

Shanta Devarajan, Chief Economist of the South Asia Region at the World Bank, has recently started a blog to "create a conversation around how South Asia can end poverty in a generation". Its name: End Poverty in South Asia

 

Paul Krugman has also started blogging at the New York Times.

 

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