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The economic rationale for investing in family planning in Sub-Saharan Africa

Peter Glick's picture

Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) continues to have much higher fertility and lower contraceptive usage than any other region: the contraceptive prevalence rate of 22% is less than half that of South Asia (53%) and less than a third that of East Asia (77%). 

Putting an end to childhood malnutrition

Tim Evans's picture



‘Stunted children today means stunted economies tomorrow.’ This sentiment, recently expressed by African Development Bank President Akin Adesina, encapsulates the sea change in how malnutrition is now viewed by global actors. Mr. Adesina was speaking at an event to launch a new global investment framework called Investing in Nutrition, co-authored by the World Bank and Results for Development Institute, which firmly establishes the importance of nutrition as a foundational part of development.

With the right tools, maternal and child health goals are within our reach

Flavia Bustreo's picture



When I became deputy director of the Child Survival Partnership in 2004, I knew the task at hand –saving mothers and children -- was a chal­lenging one. Four years earlier, the world’s countries had agreed on Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) to improve maternal health and reduce child mortality. We knew that moving the needle on maternal and child survival would take more headway and greater advances than had been seen to date.

The complex factors involved in family fertility decisions

Anne Bakilana's picture
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Preference for large families continues to be a major factor determining levels of fertility in Sub-Saharan Africa. Recent data from DHS demonstrate reasons why men and women prefer and choose to have large families. Though factors influencing women’s decisions are complex and vary from one society to another, there are also similarities.

Mobilizing domestic resources for universal health coverage

Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala's picture
Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank
In September 2015 the entire world committed to 17 goals and 169 targets. In addition to eradicating poverty, this sustainable development agenda will cover economic, social and environmental issues. Economists have estimated that the cost of implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will run into trillions of dollars.  So countries, donors, foundations and the private sector are being asked to fund interventions that will improve everything from our skies to our oceans, including our health that will improve, education, wellbeing, etc., and everything in between. All of which are, of course, crucial for sustainable development. 
 

Shaping a new era for health financing

Tim Evans's picture
At the Universal Health Coverage (UHC) Annual Financing Forum in Washington, DC, USA, on April 14–15, 2016, governments and development partners will debate how to raise and organize public and private resources needed for low-income and lower- middle-income countries to assure affordable, quality health care to all of their people by 2030.

Live, Love, Laugh: A message from Deepika Padukone

Deepika Padukone's picture
Editor's note: Deepika shared the message below to be read at today's Out of the Shadows event, which aims to make mental health a global development priority. We have reposted the message in full below.

Let me begin by saying how deeply sorry I am that I couldn't make it today. As you know, Mental Health is a cause very close to my heart and it would have meant so much to me to be here in person.

We need to bring mental health illnesses out of the shadows

Agnes Binagwaho's picture
 



I personally felt mental health’s deep-rooted importance when I returned home to Rwanda in 1996, just after my people were traumatized by the 1994 Tutsi genocide. At a time when we needed mental health services the most, there was only one psychiatrist in the entire country.

The three factors to halving childhood stunting in Peru over just a decade

Alessandra Marini's picture

In 2000, one in three Peruvian children under 5-years-old suffered from chronic malnutrition. Several years later despite high economic growth and hundreds of millions of dollars spent in nutrition programs, the stunting rate barely inched down. Then, something happened.

Figure 1. Stunting Rate, Peru 2000-2015 (% of under-5 children)

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