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Standing #WithRefugees: Helping Jordan with the Provision of Health Services to Syrian Refugees

Aakanksha H Pande's picture
Syrian refugee children at Za’atari Camp, Jordan
Photo credit: Aaka Pande, March 15, 2017

March 15, 2017. She looked at me curiously, sipping on her juice box. Her pink sweater in contrast to her anemic pallor. If it had not been for the drip in her right arm, she could be any five year old child. Except she was not. She was a refugee, one of the more than 650,000 Syrians that Jordan has been hosting since the start of the war. Exactly six years ago, the civil war in Syria had started a couple of miles away. Six years later the war continued. It was all this girl had seen in her lifetime.

Connecting Climate Change and Health for Better Development

James Close's picture
Also available in: Français
Woman wears mask to protect from pollution. China.
Photo: © Curt Carnemark / World Bank



Climate change is already having real, measurable impacts on human health, and those impacts are expected to grow. Low- and middle-income countries are seeing the worst effects as they are most vulnerable to climate shifts and least able to adapt given weak health systems and poor infrastructure. The good news is that the cumulative impacts of climate change on health have been extensively discussed for decades and understanding is growing.

Pandemics will strike but countries' preparedness is less certain

Prof. Dr. Recep Akdağ's picture



Turkey is a transcontinental country, with territory contiguously spanning two continents. It is bordered by eight countries and is circled by sea on three sides. The international airport in Istanbul is the 10th busiest airport in the world, and last year, in 2016, more than 60 million passengers went through it. Of these, two-thirds were international passengers. Yes, Turkey is very vulnerable to disease outbreaks. Indeed, all countries are.

World No Tobacco Day 2017: Why Does It Matter?

Patricio V. Marquez's picture


"Sugar, rum, and tobacco, are commodities which are nowhere necessaries of life, [but] which are ... objects of almost universal consumption, and which are therefore extremely proper subjects of taxation."

-    Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776)


World No Tobacco Day 2017 focuses on the links between tobacco use, tobacco control, and sustainable development. Does this mean that tobacco use is more than a public health issue?  The answer is an emphatic yes, rooted in robust scientific evidence accumulated over the past five decades and country experiences worldwide. Let me explain.

Statement on appointment of Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus

Tim Evans's picture
On behalf of the World Bank, I extend our very warm congratulations to Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus on his election as Director-General of the World Health Organization.  He brings a wealth of expertise and experience that will help steer WHO to have even greater impact. We look forward to strengthening our collaboration with WHO under the leadership of Dr.Tedros in our common pursuit of supporting countries to accelerate progress towards universal health coverage and to improve their preparedness to manage epidemic threats.
        

How a new eLearning course will help improve countries’ civil registration and vital statistics systems

Samuel Mills's picture

 

Civil registration and vital statistics systems enable parents to certify
children at birth. A birth certificate provides proof of age, which enables
access to essential services (e.g., health care, education, welfare grants) and
protects against child marriage and child labor.
Photo: Ray Witlin / World Bank


For some people in low- and middle-income countries, opening a bank account, taking out a loan, obtaining a driver’s license, or sending their children to school is out of reach because they don’t have official documents that prove their legal identity. Why do some people lack birth certificates, marriage certificates, family members’ death certificates, and other documentation?

Financing pandemic preparedness: from analysis to recommendations

Peter Sands's picture
James Cooper, Sunday Bondo and Patrick Lappaya work together closely to take a sample
swab to help determine the death of a women at C.H. Rennie Hospital in Kakata, Margibi
County in Liberia on March 10, 2016. Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank

In my blog in February I described the rationale behind the creation of the International Working Group on Financing Preparedness (“IWG”), which is focused on how to ensure sustainable funding for the first line of defence against pandemics – prevention, identification and containment of infectious disease outbreaks at a national level. The IWG had its second face-to –face meeting earlier this month in London at Wellcome Trust. The goal of this meeting was to review the analytical work that had taken place over the last couple of months and debate a draft set of recommendations. Since that meeting we have been refining these recommendations with a view to presenting them in draft form to the UN Secretary General’s Global Health Crisis taskforce on May 1 and launching the full report at the World Health Assembly on May 25.

Financing the ‘last mile’ in global polio eradication

Oleg Kucheryavenko's picture
A health worker vaccinates a child for polio. Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank



Thirty years ago, polio affected nearly 350,000 people per year across 125 countries. Today, the poliovirus is circulating in only two countries, Afghanistan and Pakistan, where five new cases have been reported so far in 2017. But progress to eliminate polio in the region has been difficult, particularly in North-West Pakistan, an area affected by deadly flooding, ongoing conflict, and attacks against vaccine health workers.

Why nutrition is a smart development investment

Julia Dayton Eberwein's picture



“If breastfeeding did not already exist, someone who invented it today would deserve a dual Nobel Prize in medicine and economics.” - World Bank Vice President of Human Development, Keith Hansen


This is a sentiment long-shared by many of us in the nutrition community and as the global movement in nutrition grows, so does our body of evidence supporting how powerful nutrition interventions are for individuals and for societies.

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