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In Myanmar, Setting a Goal for Universal Health Coverage

Tim Evans's picture

2014 is already shaping up to be another exciting year for the global movement for universal health coverage (UHC). I was just with World Bank Group President Jim Kim in Myanmar, where we are putting our previously announced global targets for universal health coverage into action. 

Kim Speaks on Thailand’s Path Toward Universal Health Coverage

Julia Ross's picture


On Jan. 29, 2014, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim spoke about Thailand’s effort to achieve universal health coverage at the Prince Mahidol Award Conference in Bangkok. In just one year, the country’s universal health coverage scheme added 18 million uninsured citizens to the rolls of the insured. Kim also addressed Thailand’s success in reducing new HIV infections by more than 90% from 1990 to 2013, which saved $18 billion. Read Kim’s full remarks.

Empowering Women, Girls is Vital To Tackling AIDS, Poverty

Jeni Klugman's picture
Also available in: Français


“You cannot eat a sweet with the wrapping,” young men from South Africa told researchers as part of a recent World Bank study, explaining why they refuse to wear condoms despite a high and well-known risk of HIV. Men often don’t see condoms as manly, and women feel unable to insist.

What does this mean? A 2011 Gallup poll of 19 sub-Saharan African countries, home to more than two-thirds of the world's HIV-infected population, found most adults know how to prevent the spread of HIV. But while 72 percent agreed people should use latex condoms every time they have sex, only 40 percent said they ever had.

World Bank, WHO Announce New Targets for Universal Health Coverage

Julia Ross's picture

On December 6, 2013, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim spoke at a joint Government of Japan-World Bank Conference on Universal Health Coverage in Tokyo. In his remarks, he announced that the Bank and the World Health Organization are releasing a joint framework for monitoring progress toward universal health coverage with two targets, one for financial protection, and one for service delivery.

Getting health right: An impact evaluation in the Philippines

Aliza Marcus's picture


Over the past two decades, infant mortality in the Philippines has dropped by more than half. The number of women dying in childbirth has declined, and mortality rates from diseases such as tuberculosis have fallen. The country, however, still isn’t close to meeting the 2015 health targets in the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. 
 

World AIDS Day: Bank, Global Fund Focus on Saving Lives, Stronger Health Systems

David Wilson's picture


On this year’s World AIDS Day – 1 December 2013 –the world commemorates remarkable scientific progress against AIDS and the translation of this progress into saving lives: In the last decade, new HIV infections, AIDS deaths and TB-related deaths among people with AIDS have declined by one- third.

Risking Your Health

Damien de Walque's picture
Also available in: Español | Français


All over the world, people engage in behaviors that are risky for their health. They smoke, use illicit drugs, drink too much alcohol, eat unhealthy food or adopt sedentary lifestyles, and have risky sexual encounters. As a consequence, they endanger their health, reduce their own life expectancy, and often impose harmful consequences on others.

Human Resources for Health: The Time Is Now for Concerted Action

Tim Evans's picture



This week I’m in Recife, Brazil, at the Third Global Forum on Human Resources for Health (HRH). The forum focuses on the crucial role that health workers play in delivering health services to those in need and achieving universal health coverage. These workers are the engines of achievement in every health system, yet countries face acute and chronic health workforce challenges that are too often rate-limiting in achieving results.

Polio’s End Game

Tim Evans's picture



This year on World Polio Day, health practitioners, policymakers and supporters of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) are more determined than ever to eliminate a disease that has plagued humanity since ancient times.  We are frustratingly close to our goal: By the end of 2012, the total number of polio cases worldwide dropped 66% over the previous year to 223. To cross the finish line, however, integrating polio eradication into routine immunization and broader health service delivery will be critical, particularly in communities where the security situation hampers highly visible health campaigns.
 

Diseases Without Borders: Managing the Risk of Pandemics

Olga Jonas's picture

Gerardo Bravo Garcia, Avian Flu Series, 2006, Oil & Gold Leaf on Canvas -
Courtesy of the World Bank Art Program


This blog is based on the World Development Report 2014: Risks and Opportunity - Managing Risk for Development, which discusses pandemics in Chapter 8 on global risks.

Pandemics do not start in a vacuum. A staggering 2.3 billion infections by zoonotic (animal-borne) pathogens afflict people in developing countries every year. Some pathogens become capable of easy human-to-human spread, like AIDS, flu, or severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The diseases harm health, nutrition, and food and income security. The poorest are hit the worst, as they tend to live with livestock or near wild animals in settings where animal disease incidence is high and public health standards are low.

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