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Financing health for all

Nana Taona Kuo's picture



Universal health coverage, a pillar of sustainable development, is highlighted in Agenda 2030, to promote health and well-being for all. Propelled by the United Nations and global partners, the universal health coverage movement has gained momentum, calling on countries to scale up efforts so that every person—but especially the disenfranchised and most vulnerable amongst us—can access affordable, quality care.

Where did the demographers in Africa go?

Anne Bakilana's picture



We are writing this from Pretoria, at the seventh African Population Conference (APC) jointly hosted by the government of South Africa and the Union for African Population Studies (UAPS). The conference  is convened only once every four years, so this was a rare opportunity for the World Bank Group to engage the region’s academicians and policymakers on the conference’s key theme: Demographic Dividend in Africa: Prospects, Opportunities and Challenges.

Shining a light on mental illness: An “invisible disability”

Patricio V. Marquez's picture



This year’s International Day of Persons with Disabilities, observed December 3, takes as its theme: “Inclusion matters: Access and Empowerment for People of all Abilities.”  Under this umbrella, the U.N. and other international agencies urge inclusion of persons with “invisible disabilities” in society and in development efforts.

World AIDS Day: Four steps to achieve epidemic control

David Wilson's picture

Also available in: Español | Français | العربية



World AIDS Day 2015 marks an unheralded but profound increase in our response to HIV and other major infectious diseases. In the last year, HIV diagnostics and medicines have made a real step change, as better and cheaper viral load tests and lower-dose, less toxic, more effective and cheaper drugs come to market. Drug costs are at their lowest ever, with generic first-line regimens costing $95-158 per patient per year – a 60-70% reduction from 2007-2014.

Cancer care: A neglected area in global health?

Hellen Gelband's picture

Also available in: Español | العربية



Paul Farmer recently wrote in this space about Essential Surgery, the first volume released of nine expected in the Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition series. He characterized that book as shining a spotlight on a long-neglected topic in global health and gave these reasons for the neglect: “Prevailing wisdom dictated that the surgical disease burden was too low, surgical expenses too high, and delivery of care too complicated.”

Civil registration and vital statistics: key to better data on maternal mortality

Samuel Mills's picture
Domimic Chavez / World Bank 2015


Today, the UN Maternal Mortality Estimation Inter-Agency Group (MMEIG)* released Trends in Maternal Mortality: 1990 to 2015.  It reports that, worldwide, maternal mortality ratio (MMR) declined by almost 44% between 1990 and 2015, from 385 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births to 216. 

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