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Standing #WithRefugees: Helping Jordan with the Provision of Health Services to Syrian Refugees

Aakanksha H Pande's picture
Syrian refugee children at Za’atari Camp, Jordan
Photo credit: Aaka Pande, March 15, 2017

March 15, 2017. She looked at me curiously, sipping on her juice box. Her pink sweater in contrast to her anemic pallor. If it had not been for the drip in her right arm, she could be any five year old child. Except she was not. She was a refugee, one of the more than 650,000 Syrians that Jordan has been hosting since the start of the war. Exactly six years ago, the civil war in Syria had started a couple of miles away. Six years later the war continued. It was all this girl had seen in her lifetime.

Are all medical procedures, drugs good for the patient?

Patricio V. Marquez's picture

Also available in: РусскийPatients waiting at health center in Angola (credit: UN/Evan Schneider).

When healthcare professionals take the Hippocratic Oath, they promise to prescribe patients regimens based on their “ability and judgment” and to “never do harm to anyone”.

Although extraordinary progress in medical knowledge during the last 50 years, coupled with the development of new technologies, drugs and procedures, has improved health conditions and quality of life, it has also created an ever-growing quandary regarding which drugs, medical procedures, tests and treatments work best.

And for policy makers, administrators and health economists, the unrestrained acquisition and use of new medical technologies and procedures (e.g., open heart surgery to replace clogged arteries, ultrasound technology scanners to aid in the detection of heart disease, and life-saving antiretroviral drugs for HIV/AIDS) is increasing health expenditures in an era of fiscal deficits.

In many countries, I’ve see how ensuring value for money in a limited-resources environment is not only difficult but requires careful selection and funding of procedures and drugs. It also comes with serious political, economic and ethical implications—and with new drugs and technologies appearing every day, this challenge isn’t going away. What should countries do?

Все ли методы лечения и лекарства хороши для пациента?

Patricio V. Marquez's picture

Patients waiting at health center in Angola (credit: UN/Evan Schneider).

Принимая клятву Гиппократа, профессионалы из области здравоохранения обязуются лечить пациентов, основываясь на своих «способностях и суждениях», а так же «никогда и никому не навредить».

Впечатляющий прорыв в области врачебных знаний за последние 50 лет, сопровождаемый развитием новых высоких технологий, лекарств и методик лечения, значительно улучшил средний уровень здоровья и качества жизни в целом. Однако при этом зачастую это приводит к ситуации, когда все труднее и труднее становится определять, какие же лекарственные средства, методики, тесты и процедуры окажутся самыми эффективными.

 

 Для тех, кто принимает решения и управляет экономикой здравоохранения, бесконечное приобретение и внедрение новых медицинских технологий и процедур (например, операции на открытом сердце, ультразвуковая сканеры для выявления болезней сердца, а так же антиретровирусная терапия против ВИЧ/СПИД) ведет к существенному росту расходов на здравоохранение, особенно заметного в эпоху бюджетных дефицитов.