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Nigeria’s seven lessons from polio and Ebola response

Ayodeji Oluwole Odutolu's picture

Amid the devastating effects of West Africa’s Ebola outbreak to human lives, communities, institutions, systems and the economy, there are lessons to be learned for the region to be better prepared to handle future outbreaks.

Granted, the Ebola outbreak in Nigeria was caught early before it spiralled out of control, unlike in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea, but Nigeria was also able to successfully contain the disease. The country would have not been able to respond so swiftly if it had not had a history of responding to public health emergencies, such as recurrent cholera and Lassa fever outbreaks and lead poisoning, and developed an appropriate response capacity.
 
Some components of the Ebola response in Nigeria were adapted from the country’s polio eradication efforts, as well as infrastructure and capacity built in response to an Avian Flu outbreak in 2006. Until recently, polio had debilitated thousands of Nigerian children annually. In 2015, Nigeria marked the one-year anniversary of Wild Polio Virus interruption, and had before been declared Ebola-free.
 
So we ask: How did a previously weak system suddenly gain the momentum to operate efficiently and yield favorable outcomes?  Are there lessons we can learn related to the effectiveness of future disease surveillance and emergency response efforts? In both instances [Ebola and polio], we found an alignment of several factors – what we call the seven “P’s:”

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Julia Ross's picture

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Nigeria has reason to celebrate. The country recently marked one year with no polio cases, bringing the world one step closer to eradicating a terrible disease that now circulates in only two remaining countries. To commemorate the global health milestone, Nigeria’s President Buhari gave his own three-month-old granddaughter a few drops of oral polio vaccine – a moment captured by a photographer and sent round the world via social media. It also sent a clear public health message: vaccination works.

Five lessons from Nigeria's polio eradication efforts

Ayodeji Oluwole Odutolu's picture
Dr. Andrew Etsano, Incident Manager of the Nigeria Polio Emergency Operation Center
President Buhari of Nigeria vaccinates his 3-month-old granddaughter to mark one year of no polio cases in Nigeria.

​Photo courtesy of Dr. Andrew Etsano, Incident Manager of the Nigeria Polio Emergency Operation Center

On July 24th Nigeria celebrated a huge milestone in the global effort to eradicate polio. It has been one year since the country has had a case of wild polio. This means that it has interrupted transmission of the crippling disease.

Global Financing Facility and a new era for development finance

Tim Evans's picture



This week at the Third International Financing for Development Conference in Addis Ababa, we’ve seen the birth of a new era in global health financing.
 
The World Bank Group, together with our partners in the United Nations, Canada, Norway, and the United States, just launched the Global Financing Facility in support of Every Woman Every Child.  It’s hard to believe it’s been less than 10 months since the GFF was first announced at the 2014 UN General Assembly by World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, Prime Minister Stephen Harper of Canada and Prime Minister Erna Solberg of Norway.  We’re grateful to the hundreds of representatives from developing countries, UN agencies, bilateral and multilateral development partners, civil society and the private sector who have contributed their time, ideas, and expertise to inform and shape the design of the GFF to get it ready to become operational.   

Global Financing Facility ushers in new era for every woman, every child

Melanie Mayhew's picture
A New Era for Every Woman, Every Child


This week in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, during the Third International Financing for Development Conference, the United Nations, along with the World Bank Group, and the governments of Canada, Norway and the United States, joined country and global health leaders to launch the Global Financing Facility (GFF) in support of Every Woman Every Child. Partners announced that $12 billion in domestic and international, private and public funding had already been aligned to country-led five-year investment plans for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health in the four GFF front-runner countries: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania.

Universal health coverage: Time for an ambitious call for equity in health

Winnie Byanyima's picture




People want dignity, people want rights

In the global survey World We Want 2015, health was the first priority of people living in poor countries. This was not surprising. Every year in Africa, nearly a quarter of a million children under five die because their parents cannot afford to pay for treatment. According to the World Health Organization, 150 million people face catastrophic health care costs every year, while 100 million are pushed into poverty because of direct payments. Increasingly, poor people are protesting the denial of their basic right to access health care when they need it.

Polio’s End Game

Tim Evans's picture



This year on World Polio Day, health practitioners, policymakers and supporters of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) are more determined than ever to eliminate a disease that has plagued humanity since ancient times.  We are frustratingly close to our goal: By the end of 2012, the total number of polio cases worldwide dropped 66% over the previous year to 223. To cross the finish line, however, integrating polio eradication into routine immunization and broader health service delivery will be critical, particularly in communities where the security situation hampers highly visible health campaigns.