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Health

Institutions and Systems Matter for Health and Social Development

Patricio V. Marquez's picture

This past week, I attended a couple of interesting seminars at the World Bank’s Human Development Forum on how some mineral-rich countries have been able to translate their newfound riches into sustained economic growth, improved living conditions, and  better nutrition, health and education levels for their populations.

Global Burden of Disease: Implications for the World Bank’s Work in Health

Julie McLaughlin's picture

 

The global health community is abuzz about the results of the latest Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD 2010) launched earlier this month.  While experts will continue to debate the methodologies used to derive estimates of disease and mortality for 187 countries, and to assess 67 risk factors, the study’s conclusions still carry important messages for the World Bank’s work in health.

Can improved health conditions contribute to long-term economic growth?

Patricio V. Marquez's picture

In the face of budgetary limitations, constrained international aid, and competitive demands from different sectors, how can those of us working in the health sector make a strong case to finance ministers that public investments in health are  as productive as public investments in, say, infrastructure or agriculture? 

Routine Immunization: A Systemic Approach to Polio Eradication

Kees Kostermans's picture

Since 1988, when the World Health Organization,  Rotary International, CDC and UNICEF launched the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) more than US$ 8.2 billion has been invested in polio immunization and surveillance. It’s an investment that has paid off: The number of polio cases worldwide decreased by more than 99%, from 350,000 in 1988 to less than 650 cases in 2011, while the number of polio endemic countries (those with ongoing domestic transmission of the virus) decreased from over 125 to just three: Afghanistan, Nigeria and Pakistan. 

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