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malaria

Survie de l’enfant: Un impératif des systèmes de santé

Cristian Baeza's picture


La semaine dernière, l’Inde, l’Éthiopie et les États-Unis organisés un Sommet pour des actions concrètes en faveur de la survie de l’enfant, avec la participation de représentants venus du monde entier. Cet événement est à la fois opportun et fondamental : l’enjeu est de renforcer davantage les engagements pris sur le plan national et international ainsi que la responsabilité des pays dans la réalisation du quatrième objectif du Millénaire pour le développement (OMD), qui vise à réduire la mortalité infantile. Si de nombreux progrès ont été accomplis dans ce domaine, il est des pays qui risquent de ne pas remplir cet objectif à l'horizon 2015 et qui ont le plus besoin de notre soutien et de notre coopération.

Supervivencia infantil: Un imperativo de los sistemas de salud

Cristian Baeza's picture

Child Survival Call to Action

La semana pasada, los Gobiernos de India, Etiopía y Estados Unidos organizaron una Cumbre de Llamamiento a la Acción para la Supervivencia Infantil, con la participación de líderes mundiales y nacionales. Se trata de un evento oportuno y fundamental, destinado a fortalecer aún más el compromiso mundial y de los países y la responsabilidad de estos en el logro del objetivo de desarrollo del milenio (ODM) 4: reducir la mortalidad infantil. Aunque hemos observado una mejora sustancial en esta meta, los países que requie renmás de nuestro apoyo y asociación podrían no alcanzarla para 2015.

Child survival: A health systems imperative

Cristian Baeza's picture

Child Survival Call to Action

This week, the governments of India, Ethiopia and the United States will host a Child Survival Call to Action summit, with the participation of country and global leaders. This is a timely and critical event, aimed at further strengthening global and country commitment and country accountability for MDG4, to reduce child mortality. Though we’ve seen substantial improvement on this goal, the countries that need our support and partnership most may not reach it by 2015.

Malaria is a preventable and treatable disease, but for how long?

Maryse Pierre-Louis's picture

www.worldbank.org/malaria

This year, on World Malaria Day, April 25, the global health community has reason to celebrate. Indeed, thanks to substantial investments from partners and countries over the last decade, the scorecard on malaria reports good news:  a reduction of more than 50% in confirmed malaria cases or malaria admissions and deaths in recent years in at least 11 countries south of the Sahara, and in 32 endemic countries outside of Africa. Overall, the number of deaths due to malaria is estimated to have decreased from 985,000 in 2000 to 655,000 in 2010. 

The fact that an estimated 1.1 million African children were saved from the deadly grip of malaria over the last decade is an extraordinary achievement. By the end of 2010, a total of 289 million insecticide-treated nets were delivered to sub-Saharan Africa, enough to cover 76% of the 765 million persons at risk.

Over the past 5 years, four countries were certified as having eliminated malaria: Morocco, Turkmenistan, the UAE and Armenia.  In southern Africa, health ministers of eight countries -- Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Angola, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe--have developed a regional strategy to progress towards E8 malaria elimination status.  

Putting Humpty Dumpty back together again

Cristian Baeza's picture

2012 is off to a sobering start for those of us in the global health community, against a backdrop of continuing global financial volatility coupled with complex reforms at the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. New research from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IMHE) shows a slowdown—and perhaps a plateauing—of the historical growth in global health funding to which we have been accustomed during the past decade. This new reality is, rightly, leading to questions about whether substantial—if not radical—changes are needed in the highly fragmented global health ecosystem. And yet, at the same time, there are signs of new initiatives.

I believe the slowdown in global health funding requires adjusting our expectations in the coming years. Last fall, after participating in a number of inspiring discussions during the UN General Assembly, I reflected about each one of the critical global health priorities to which we have all pledged our support in recent years: the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for nutrition, child and maternal health, and HIV/AIDS, TB, and malaria, as well as non-communicable diseases. It struck me that while most of these health interventions are destined to help the same mother or child, we have created very separate initiatives and institutions to deliver on each. We have been able to elevate the awareness and commitments for each of these priorities, but now the challenge is, like Humpty Dumpty, how do we now put them all back together again?

Investing early in children: what will it take to spur integrated action?

Leslie Elder's picture

Last week, the World Bank hosted the Washington, D.C., launch of The Lancet’s 2011 child development series, four years after the journal revealed that more than 200 million children under five in low- and middle-income countries were not reaching their developmental potential, due to (preventable) risk factors like stunting, iron and iodine deficiencies, and lack of cognitive stimulation. The latest research findings in The Lancet provide even greater clarity on the developmental inequality that continues to plague many millions of children.