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Health

Why The First 1,000 Days Matter Most

Roger Thurow's picture



This blog first appeared in the New York Times on June 20, 2016.

Nutrition is not only fundamental to an individual’s cognitive and physical growth, it is also the cornerstone of all development efforts, whether improving education, health, income or equality, at home or abroad. And the most important time for good nutrition is in the 1,000 days from the beginning of a woman’s pregnancy to the second birthday of her child. What happens in those first days determines to a large extent the course of a child’s life – his or her ability to grow, learn, work, succeed – and, by extension, the long-term health, stability and prosperity of the society in which that child lives.

Focusing on Patient Safety and Quality of Care: Preventing Medical Malpractice and Negligence in Kenya

Njeri Mwaura's picture

A recent study on patient safety in Kenya revealed that less that 5% of health facilities, both public and private, have attained the minimum international standards of safety. Although such studies are rare, there is reason to believe that the same picture prevails in most of SS Africa.

How the Tamil Nadu Health System was transformed to a paperless health system in just 10 years

Ramesh Govindaraj's picture



Globally, the demand for timely and accurate health information is growing, driven mainly by an increased focus on strategic resource allocation and priority setting, as well as the availability of technology. However, in real life, setting up a system to capture accurate and timely information comes with many challenges especially in low and middle income countries. System inputs are often costly, hard to build and maintain and difficult to integrate. 

Plain packaging & tobacco taxes: an antidote for manipulation and deception

Patricio V. Marquez's picture


For 2016's World No Tobacco Day, celebrated today, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Secretariat of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) are calling on countries to get ready for plain packaging of tobacco products.  Why, may you ask? 

The economic rationale for investing in family planning in Sub-Saharan Africa

Peter Glick's picture

Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) continues to have much higher fertility and lower contraceptive usage than any other region: the contraceptive prevalence rate of 22% is less than half that of South Asia (53%) and less than a third that of East Asia (77%). 

Putting an end to childhood malnutrition

Tim Evans's picture
Also available in: Español



‘Stunted children today means stunted economies tomorrow.’ This sentiment, recently expressed by African Development Bank President Akin Adesina, encapsulates the sea change in how malnutrition is now viewed by global actors. Mr. Adesina was speaking at an event to launch a new global investment framework called Investing in Nutrition, co-authored by the World Bank and Results for Development Institute, which firmly establishes the importance of nutrition as a foundational part of development.

With the right tools, maternal and child health goals are within our reach

Flavia Bustreo's picture



When I became deputy director of the Child Survival Partnership in 2004, I knew the task at hand –saving mothers and children -- was a chal­lenging one. Four years earlier, the world’s countries had agreed on Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) to improve maternal health and reduce child mortality. We knew that moving the needle on maternal and child survival would take more headway and greater advances than had been seen to date.

Mobilizing domestic resources for universal health coverage

Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala's picture
Also available in: Español
Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank
In September 2015 the entire world committed to 17 goals and 169 targets. In addition to eradicating poverty, this sustainable development agenda will cover economic, social and environmental issues. Economists have estimated that the cost of implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will run into trillions of dollars.  So countries, donors, foundations and the private sector are being asked to fund interventions that will improve everything from our skies to our oceans, including our health that will improve, education, wellbeing, etc., and everything in between. All of which are, of course, crucial for sustainable development. 
 

Shaping a new era for health financing

Tim Evans's picture
At the Universal Health Coverage (UHC) Annual Financing Forum in Washington, DC, USA, on April 14–15, 2016, governments and development partners will debate how to raise and organize public and private resources needed for low-income and lower- middle-income countries to assure affordable, quality health care to all of their people by 2030.

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