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  • Reply to: The cost of antimicrobial resistance is too high to ignore   3 days 2 hours ago

    Antimicrobial Resistance remain a major public health problem in Africa. In Mali (West african county) according to 3 years surveillance result in capital city (Bamako), more than 30% of enterobacteria (among them Klebsiella, Escherichia, etc.) isolated in routine activites were resistance to at least 3 antibacterials. Currently, we isolated some bacteria with multidrug resistance from communities and hospitalized patients. In addition, HIV drug resistance became a challenge because if all patients living with HIV must be threated, we need to rienforce virological monitoring to prevent and to manage efficienty HIV drug resistance occur.
    We have some patients without possibility to be treat because of multidrug resistance issues.
    Through global health security agenda, we are training all hospital lab agent to identify and perform susceptibility testing.
    In general, low income countries need to be very reinforced to conduct a sustainability combat again antimicrobial resistance, if not, the burden will increased regarding human and animal health.

  • Reply to: The end of the end of AIDS   2 weeks 4 days ago

    Thank you for bringing the discussion back to the real world. As you wrote, "Unless we balance our celebration of the success of AIDS treatment with a sober appraisal of and rejoinder to these threats, we risk a reversal of painstaking gains."
    However there is one obstacle to success that is not discussed in your article or most discussions at AIDS 2016 and other gatherings. The obstacle is the lack of infrastructure, especially in Sub Saharan Africa.
    Even before we became aware of AIDS in 1981, there was a substantial shortage of trained medical personnel on the continent. Adding tens of millions of people living with HIV has dramatically exacerbated this shortage. Yet, we can't find anyone addressing the issue in any significant way. And this does not even address the need for more equipment for doing the necessary tests for following patients on treatment.
    We talk a great deal about TAsP, Test and Treat, PREP, PEP, and other strategies showing such positive results in the West. However, it is totally unrealistic to propose these especially in rural African in settings until someone figures out a way to get more trained medical professionals to diagnose, prescribe, and follow these approaches.
    When are we going to find this issue on the agenda for conferences like the recently completed AIDS 2016? Until we do, any talk of bring an end to the public health threat of HIV on the continent where more than 70% of the people living with HIV reside is irresponsible as it gives the world a totally unrealistic view of what can be accomplished.

  • Reply to: The end of the end of AIDS   4 weeks 16 hours ago

    good move.we highly support your call fot the prioritization by various gvt.leaders and stake holders..The CBO N NGOS which atr in this fight should b supported fully.Finally..are there some chances if not posdibilities of totally treating this monster? If yes..how soon?

    Viva la rasa.

  • Reply to: The three factors to halving childhood stunting in Peru over just a decade   1 month 5 days ago

    Clear direction + Right incentives + Good leadership = A formula for success for all our development initiatives.

  • Reply to: South Asia’s Quest for Reduced Maternal Mortality: What the Data Show   1 month 5 days ago

    Dear Sameh and Naoko,

    Thanks for sharing your work, it is in deed a very relevant and informative article. I am a medical anthropologist and am currently conducting research on maternal and child health in Bangladesh. As part of my research I am interviewing experts in the field especially with reference to MDG5. It would be very helpful if you could both participate in my research and share your expert opinion. Please email me your contact information so that I can follow up accordingly. I look forward to hearing from you.

    Best wishes.