Syndicate content

The Obesity Epidemic and the Battle for What Our Kids Eat at School

María Eugenia Bonilla-Chacín's picture


I recently read in a newspaper about a video of an obese 12-year-old who collapsed at school in Mexico and later died from a heart attack.  Although the newspaper could not certify the veracity of the video, it is an awful reminder of the large burden of overweight and obesity, suffered not only by adults but children in Mexico and other developing countries.

Is Unemployment Bad for Your Health?

Patricio V. Marquez's picture



The media have been reporting these days that the U.S. economy continues to grow, and more people are being hired each month, bringing the unemployment rate down to 5.6%--a level not seen since the late 1990s.  Unfortunately, in some parts of the world, the negative impact of the 2008 Great Recession continues to be felt. Among some European Union countries, the share of the unemployed remains at unprecedented high levels, particularly among young adults.  In Spain and Greece, for example, the unemployment rate is about 25%. 

South Asia’s Quest for Reduced Maternal Mortality: What the Data Show

Sameh El-Saharty's picture


In 17th century India, the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan built an immense tomb of white marble—known as the Taj Mahal—in memory of his wife, Mumtaz Mahal, who died during the birth of their 14th child. The mausoleum, revered for its beauty, also serves as a sad reminder that maternal deaths have forever plagued humanity.  

The Path to Zero: Ebola at Year’s End

Tim Evans's picture
© UNICEF


It’s been a difficult year for the people of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, and all those fighting to end the terrible­­ Ebola epidemic that took thousands of lives, spread fear and destabilized economies. Though the globa­­­­­l response to this crisis was too slow, at year’s end, there are hopeful signs that international mobilization is having an impact, and that the countries most affected by the disease are coalescing around the goal of “zero cases.”

Health Information Systems: The New Penicillin… And It's In Use in Barbados!

Carmen Carpio's picture



Penicillin was discovered almost 90 years ago and heralded the beginning of a revolutionary era in medicine.  As the first antibiotic drug in existence, it was used to treat what had previously been severe and life-threatening illnesses, such as meningitis, pneumonia, and syphilis.

World AIDS Day: Q/A with World Bank’s David Wilson

Julia Ross's picture

This blog in French | This blog in Spanish



To mark World AIDS Day—December 1-- I asked David Wilson, the World Bank’s Global AIDS Program Director, for a few thoughts on the state of the epidemic, new approaches to reaching populations at risk of HIV infection, and lessons from the AIDS response that might apply to the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

Pages