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Eliminating River Blindness: Clear and Bold Vision Required

Tim Evans's picture


In 1974, onchocerciasis -- a parasitic disease that causes blindness and is transmitted by black flies --  was raging in many parts of West Africa.  The disease, also known as river blindness, was concentrated in the villages lying close to the rivers where the black fly breeds. In such villages, the spectre of young children leading blind adults with a stick was a common sight. Indeed, the high levels of blindness and the weight of parasitic burden on the population led to the abandonment of many villages and the cultivation of land in otherwise fertile river valleys.  

Linking Providers, Patients and Health Systems: Are We Ready for a Data Revolution?

Fernando Montenegro Torres's picture



Imagin­e the case of Julio: A young father in a low-income country who has just been told his wife and b­aby are dead.  He hears what the physician is saying but can’t believe it. He had been assured that his wife would be OK. He accompanied her on prenatal visits as he was told to do, so how could this have happened?

Ten (Plus One) Things to Think About When Planning and Implementing Universal Health Coverage

Robert Marten's picture


Photo Credit: UN Foundation

This blog originally appeared on June 11, 2014 on The Rockefeller Foundation website.

In a previous post, I wrote about the Seven Things You Should Know About Universal Health Coverage (UHC). Here's another post digging deeper into the "how to" of making reforms happen, which list considerations critical to the planning, implementation, and measurement of UHC.

A Tale of Two Panamas: How Results-Based Financing Improves Health for Rural Mothers and Children

Carmen Carpio's picture


When Charles Dickens wrote A Tale of Two Cities in 1859, he was most definitely not thinking about Latin America, let alone Panama.  He was writing about Paris and London, and more importantly, depicting important themes of poverty and inequality experienced during the French Revolution.  
 
So what does this have to do with Panama?  Well, despite more than 150 years having passed since Dickens wrote his famous tale, the themes of poverty and inequality persist and are quite evident in Panama’s health sector.  In the case of Panama, the “Two Cities” are actually a metaphor for the two very stark realities that Panama faces - urban Panama versus rural, indigenous Panama -- and the very different health outcomes experienced in each.

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