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A Tale of Two Panamas: How Results-Based Financing Improves Health for Rural Mothers and Children

Carmen Carpio's picture


When Charles Dickens wrote A Tale of Two Cities in 1859, he was most definitely not thinking about Latin America, let alone Panama.  He was writing about Paris and London, and more importantly, depicting important themes of poverty and inequality experienced during the French Revolution.  
 
So what does this have to do with Panama?  Well, despite more than 150 years having passed since Dickens wrote his famous tale, the themes of poverty and inequality persist and are quite evident in Panama’s health sector.  In the case of Panama, the “Two Cities” are actually a metaphor for the two very stark realities that Panama faces - urban Panama versus rural, indigenous Panama -- and the very different health outcomes experienced in each.

Mejorar las mediciones de la mortalidad materna mediante el fortalecimiento de los sistemas de registro civil y estadísticas vitales

Samuel Mills's picture
Also available in: English | Français



El Grupo Interinstitucional de Estimaciones de Mortalidad Materna (MMEIG, por sus siglas en inglés) dio a conocer hoy un informe sobre estas estimaciones a nivel mundial y nacional para 2013. En el mundo, la tasa de mortalidad materna (MMR, por sus siglas en inglés) se redujo de 380 muertes por cada 100 000 nacidos vivos en 1990 a 210 en 2013.

Improving the measurement of maternal mortality by strengthening civil registration and vital statistics systems

Samuel Mills's picture
Also available in: Français | Español



Today the Maternal Mortality Estimation Inter-Agency Group (MMEIG) released a report on the global and country maternal mortality estimates for 2013. Globally, maternal mortality ratio (MMR) decreased from 380 maternal deaths per 100 000 live births in 1990 to 210 in 2013. Although this 45% decline is far less than the expected 75% decrease between 1990 and 2015 in order to achieve the fifth millennium development goal (MDG 5), 19 countries were reported to have already achieved MDG 5: Belarus (96%), Maldives (93%), Bhutan (87%), Cambodia (86%), Israel (84%), Equatorial Guinea (81%), Poland (81%), Lao People's Democratic Republic (80%), Romania (80%), Bulgaria (78%), Estonia (78%), Timor-Leste (78%), Eritrea (77%), Cabo Verde (77%), Latvia (77%), Oman (77%), Lebanon (76%), Nepal (76%) and Rwanda (76%). 

L'état civil : un indicateur essentiel pour mesurer la mortalité maternelle

Samuel Mills's picture
Also available in: English | Español



Le Groupe inter-agences pour l’estimation de la mortalité maternelle (MMEIG) a publié aujourd'hui un rapport sur la mortalité maternelle dans le monde et par pays pour 2013. À l'échelle mondiale, le taux de mortalité maternelle a reculé, passant de 380 décès pour 100 000 naissances en 1990 à 210 en 2013.

7 Things You Should Know About Universal Health Coverage

Robert Marten's picture



This blog originally appeared on April 28, 2014 on The Rockefeller Foundation website.

This year’s World Bank Spring Meeting featured a blockbuster event on health entitled, Toward Universal Health Coverage by 2030, featuring United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon, World Bank President Jim Kim, Harvard Professor Lawrence Summers; Nigeria’s Minister of Finance, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala; World Health Organization Director-General Margaret Chan, and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Following this event, the French and Japanese Missions to the United Nations in New York co-hosted a panel discussion at the United Nations on national experience implementing and measuring universal health coverage citing examples from Chile, Benin, and Thailand; and presentations from both the World Health Organization and the World Bank.

Fighting Malaria: Results-Based Financing Accelerates Progress in Africa

Maryse Pierre-Louis's picture



As we celebrate World Malaria Day this year and rally behind its theme, “Invest in the Future, Defeat Malaria,” countries and the global community are celebrating major accomplishments since 2000. Malaria death rates have been reduced by half among young children, and more than 3.3 million lives have been saved. The malaria map is shrinking:  Four countries were recently certified as malaria-free (Armenia, Morocco, Turkmenistan and a United Arab Emirates), and 26 more are moving toward eliminating the disease.

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