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Why nutrition is a smart development investment

Julia Dayton Eberwein's picture
Also available in: Español



“If breastfeeding did not already exist, someone who invented it today would deserve a dual Nobel Prize in medicine and economics.” - World Bank Vice President of Human Development, Keith Hansen


This is a sentiment long-shared by many of us in the nutrition community and as the global movement in nutrition grows, so does our body of evidence supporting how powerful nutrition interventions are for individuals and for societies.

On World Health Day, why I'm choosing to talk about depression

Patricio V. Marquez's picture
Also available in: Español | Français
photo: WHO


This year’s World Health Day carries a particular significance for me and for many others. The theme, “Depression: Let’s Talk,” shines a light upon a problem that oftentimes remains hidden in a dark corner of our minds, trapping us in a painful agony of sadness, loss of interest, and fear. 

Tobacco control: saving lives and driving development

Frank J. Chaloupka's picture
No smoking sign in Nepal. World Bank / 2013

Tobacco use poses an unparalleled health and economic burden worldwide. A new study found that the diseases caused by smoking account for US$ 422 billion in health care expenditures annually, representing almost 6% of global spending on health. Smoking causes close to 6 million deaths per year - more than the deaths from HIV/AIDs, TB and Malaria combined. And the total economic cost of smoking after including productivity losses from death and disability amounts to more than US$ 1.4 trillion per year- equivalent in magnitude to 1.8% of the world’s annual GDP.

The first line of defense against outbreaks is to finance pandemic preparedness at a national level

Peter Sands's picture
A portrait of an Ebola survivor, Dr. Gassama Ibrahima at the Matam Medical Center in
Conakry, Guinea on March 16, 2015. Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank

The case for investing in pandemic preparedness is –or at least, should be -  completely compelling. Few things could kill as many people as an influenza pandemic. Few threats can cause as much economic disruption as the contagion of fear triggered by a rapidly escalating epidemic. Reinforcing capabilities such as disease surveillance, diagnostic laboratories and infection control would be more effective and cost far less than spending money to contain outbreaks when they occur. Yet, so far, the global community has demonstrably not invested enough in preparedness. As a result, too many lives have been lost and too many livelihoods damaged, and the world remains scarily vulnerable.  

One health economics for healthy people, agriculture and environment

Franck Berthe's picture
Man in field with cattle. Pakistan. Photo: Curt Carnemark / World Bank


Disease Outbreaks: A Constant Threat
 
The World Health Organization called for “heightened vigilance and strengthened surveillance efforts” last week to prevent and detect human transmission of a highly pathogenic strain of avian influenza or ‘bird flu’. And while no human cases have been reported and WHO itself called the risk “relatively low,” we know the potential devastating impacts of diseases spread from animals to humans.

Advancing global mental health action: lessons from Canada

Patricio V. Marquez's picture

Also available in: Español, Français

A portrait of Miliett Kangar at JFK Medical Center and E.S. Grant Mental Health Hospital in
Monrovia, Liberia on March 07, 2016.  (Miliett did not want to show her face in the picture)
Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank

In 2016, a lot of effort was placed on shining the light on mental health as a neglected issue in the global health and development agendas.  The flagship event organized by the World Bank Group (WBG) and the World Health Organization (WHO) during the Spring Meetings of the WBG/IMF held in Washington D.C. was an important step to galvanize attention and commitment to change this situation.

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