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Comment Madagascar s’emploie à lutter contre le fléau des retards de croissance et à améliorer le développement du jeune enfant

Jumana Qamruddin's picture
Also available in: English
Des femmes et leurs enfants partagent un repas au centre de nutrition de Soanierana
(dans le nord-est de Madagascar) après un atelier de cuisine qui leur a montré comment
préparer une alimentation riche en nutriments.
Photo: Erick Rabemananoro

À Analamanga, des jeunes femmes attendent leur tour, leur bébé dans les bras, au centre du Programme national de nutrition communautaire (PNNC). Un agent de santé vérifie le poids et l’âge d’une petite fille de six mois et note minutieusement ces informations. Pour la plupart des nouvelles mères, c’est le poids de leur bébé qui détermine avant tout l’état de santé de l’enfant. Pourtant, la taille constitue le paramètre le plus important afin d’anticiper l’évolution de la croissance et de la santé des nourrissons.

Madagascar’s Path to Reducing Stunting and Improving Child Development Outcomes

Jumana Qamruddin's picture
Also available in: Français
Women with their children share a common meal at the community nutrition center in
Soanierana (north east Madagascar) after a cooking demonstration focused on preparing
nutrient rich food.
Photo: Erick Rabemananoro



In Analamanga, Madagascar, young women stand with their babies at a Programme National de la Nutrition Communautaire (PNNC) center, one of Madagascar’s community nutrition sites. A nutrition worker cross-checks the weight and age of a six-month-old girl, diligently recording the figures. For many new mothers, the weight of their baby is the most important indicator of their child’s health. But in fact, height is the key metric for understanding their future health and development.

Mental Health Parity in the Global Health and Development Agenda

Patricio V. Marquez's picture



Why are mental disorders and substance use disorders treated so much differently than other health conditions? This is just one of the many questions that the World Bank Group, World Health Organization and other international partners will pose at their upcoming event -- Out of the Shadows: Making Mental Health a Global Development Priority -- on April 13th -14th ,  as part of the 2016 WBG/IMF Spring Meetings.

Unite to End TB

Miriam Schneidman's picture
image courtesy: TB Alliance

On March 24th the global community marks World TB day to commemorate the day in 1882 when Dr. Robert Koch discovered the cause of tuberculosis.  At the time, the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic was raging out of control in Europe and the Americas, and this discovery paved the way for millions to be successfully treated.  Today, TB remains a major public health threat with 4,000 lives lost daily to this highly curable disease.  But this TB day stands out from previous ones. 

In Liberia, mourning the lives lost to Ebola is just beginning

Melanie Mayhew's picture
Liberians visit the grave sites of lost loved ones on Decoration Day at Disco Hill Cemetery,
in Monrovia, Liberia on March 09, 2016. About 3600 suspected Ebola victims are buried
in Disco Hill Cemetery. Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank


Tears cascade down her face as she embraces the mound, her cheek pressed to the dirt, a body six feet below. She wails, screams, bends backward and then throws herself back on the grave, again and again. A wreath sheathed in plastic nestles below a simple cross marker with a name and a date: April 24, 2015 -- marking one of the 4,809 lives claimed by Ebola in Liberia.

Family Health Days – An Inspiration for International Women’s Day

Quentin Wodon's picture



On March 8, in celebration of International Women’s Day, Marion Bunch, Chief Executive Officer, Rotarians for Family Health & AIDS Prevention and founder of family health days, will participate in a World Bank event about inspiring women who made a difference in the world through innovative programs in the areas of education and health.

From crisis to clarity: Getting a handle on global pandemics

Keith Hansen's picture

This blog first appeared on Devex.com and is being reproduced here with their permission.

Little more than a year after the Ebola crisis in West Africa tragically highlighted the inadequacy of pandemic preparedness and response, the current Zika outbreak in the Americas has brought the issue back to the top of the global health agenda.

Family planning, demographic change and poverty: A call for action

Michele Gragnolati's picture
Image by Arne Hoel / World Bank 2015


More than 3,500 people, including Presidents and Prime Ministers, have gathered in Bali this week for the fourth International Conference on Family Planning . The unmet need for family planning is an urgent human right and development issue. We’ve no more time to lose!

2015: A Look Back, A Look Forward

Tim Evans's picture

 

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

I wanted to take this opportunity to wish you a Happy New Year, and reflect on several notable events from 2015 - a year of remarkable progress in global health, and remarkable expansion for the World Bank Group's health, nutrition and population portfolio, which grew to more than $10 billion.

Time to put “health” into universal health coverage

Patricio V. Marquez's picture
photo by: Patricio Marquez

While on a walk with my younger son over the holidays, we got into a good discussion about the future of health care.  After taking a class on health economics this past semester, he wanted to share his perspective about the need to “do something” to deal with the high cost of medical services that are pricing people out of health care in many countries.

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