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January 2018

Strengthening national clinical research capacities is key to epidemic preparedness and saving lives

Marie-Paule Kieny's picture
A portrait of Helena D. Sayuoh a nurse, wearing protective clothing while working at
C.H. Rennie Hospital in Kakata, Margibi County in Liberia on March 4, 2015.
Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank


The 2014–2015 Ebola epidemic was the longest and deadliest Ebola epidemic in history, resulting in 28,616 cases and 11,310 deaths and reversing a decade of mortality and economic gains in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. The statistics would probably have been very different, however, had an Ebola vaccine been available or even further along on the clinical development path.

Serbia successfully tackles antimicrobial resistance

Fadia Saadah's picture

It is estimated that annually about 700,000 people die as a result of community or hospital based infectious diseases caused by bugs resistant to antimicrobials.  A recent report by the World Bank, entitled Drug-Resistant Infections: A Threat to Our Economic Future,  reported that   if effective measures are not taken, AMR could result in a loss of up to 3.8 percent of global GDP by 2050, with poorer countries bearing the brunt of the loss. Yet, despite its importance, many countries have struggled in dealing with this issue.

Preventable traffic injuries and deaths hold back the development of countries

Patricio V. Marquez's picture
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While reading a newspaper over the holidays, one of us came across an article with an often common story: “car collision causes mass fatalities on mountain road”. The collision resulted in 51 deaths, after a bus--one of the vehicles involved, plunged down a cliff in Peru.  Many of the dead were returning to Lima after celebrating the New Year’s holiday with family outside the city.