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Accelerating progress towards universal healthcare coverage by 2030: CSOs engagement and the G20 meetings on #UHC2030

Enó Isong's picture



The 2019 World Bank Spring Meetings, as always, featured stimulating, constructive, and, sometimes avantgarde discussions and conversations. One of such productive sessions was a lunch meeting organized by the World Bank Group Health Nutrition and Population Global Practice in partnership with the Civil Society Engagement Mechanism for UHC2030 (CSEM).
 
Titled #HealthForAll on the Global Agenda in 2019: Building High-Level Political Support for Universal Health Coverage, and emphasizing collective over individual, the focus of the session was to bring together stakeholders from civil society to organize and mobilize as a constituency, advocating to ensure that Universal Health Coverage (UHC) policies are inclusive and equitable, and that systematic attention is given to the most marginalized and vulnerable populations so that no one is left behind.

El Salvador: small country, giant steps to control tobacco use

Patricio V. Marquez's picture



In a recent visit to El Salvador, the smallest, yet beautiful most densely populated country in Central America, I attended an international event organized by the Secretariat of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) for the FCTC 2030 project.  During this event, I had the opportunity to learn from government officials and the Solidarity Fund for Health (FOSALUD) team about the significant tobacco control steps taken by the country.  

According to data presented at the event, 1 in 10 adults in El Salvador smoke; the prevalence of current cigarette consumption is 17 percent among men, 2 percent among women, and 10 percent among young people.  Data from the IHME Global Burden of Disease study indicate that, in 2016, of the more than 1,600 tobacco-attributable deaths in El Salvador, almost half of them were premature deaths (before the age of 70 years). This contributed to an estimated 34,000 years of life lost due to tobacco-related premature mortality and disability. Besides these impacts, an assessment done by FOSALUD with the support of the FCTC Secretariat, UNDP and PAHO/WHO, estimates that tobacco use causes significant economic losses, including both health care costs (US$115.6 million) and loss of productivity (US$148 million), amounting to US$264 million or 1 percent of El Salvador’s GDP.

Gender inequality is a major stumbling block to human capital—global health needs to step up

Sonja Tanaka's picture

Today is World Health Day, celebrated this year under the theme of Universal Health Coverage for everyone, everywhere. Gender equalityfrom eliminating the gender pay gap in health workforces to ensuring all people have equal opportunity in accessing health services that meet their needsserves as an essential pillar in achieving universal health coverage. So on this World Health Day, we review where global health organizations themselves lead and lag in advancing equality and call for gender-transformative action.

Globally, women earn less than men. As a result, human capital worldwide is about 20% lower than it ought to be. Much of this deficit is a result of policies and practices that range from the gender-blind to the overtly discriminatory. At the national level, the World Bank reports that 2.7 billion women are still legally barred from having the same choice of jobs as men, and just six countries currently provide women and men equal rights related to work.


 

Paradigm Shift: Peru leading the way in reforming mental health services

Patricio V. Marquez's picture



We recently participated in an event held in Lima by Peru’s Ministry of Health and the Cayetano Heredia Peruvian University for the launching of a new report that assesses the initial results at the municipal level of the mental health services reform in the country.

Compelling evidence showing that the community-based initiatives to improve mental health care in Peru are helping close a major access gap that exists in most countries was shared.   

So, what are the main pillars of the Peruvian mental health reform process and its initial impact? 

In Papua New Guinea, a modern fight against an old disease: tuberculosis

Tom Perry's picture
The World Bank has joined the fight to kick TB out of Papua New Guinea. (World Bank / Tom Perry)

My last surviving grandparent, my Nanna, passed away peacefully late last year. And the end of a loved one’s life – particularly the last member of a generation – is a significant milestone in a family’s history. So I found myself spending a fair bit of time learning more about her younger self, which is when I came to know more about Ailsa.

Her burden to bear – women, aging, and depression

Seemeen Saadat's picture
An elderly woman sits outside a health clinic in rural Nepal. Photo © Aisha Faquir/World Bank

Tell me if this sounds familiar. You are speaking to someone, who says “this is just the way it is”, or “I didn’t have a choice”, or perhaps “I know it’s not right, but this is our fate”. Or perhaps you have read similar accounts. More often than not, these or similar words are spoken by women – and they are spoken around the world. Have you noticed the inflections in their voices, or the expressions on their faces? Have you wondered about these women and what their lives are truly like? Are these just statements of fact, or do they conceal a much bigger issue?  

Lutte contre ebola : impliquer la communauté représente la clé du succès

Michel Muvudi's picture
Also available in: English
16 Janvier 2019 - Beni, République Démocratique du Congo. Vincent Tremeau / World Bank 2019

Depuis plusieurs années, Ebola frappe de manière disproportionnée notre continent, et plus particulièrement les populations d’Afrique Centrale et de l’Ouest entrainant de vastes pertes en vies humaines et causant des pertes économiques considérables dans des contextes de pauvreté extrême.

Building national civil registration systems that ensure effective service delivery

Samuel Mills's picture



Ensuring that each individual at birth has a unique identification, and that such civil registration is then linked with better and easier access to critical public services such as education, health, social welfare, and financial services is now a growing priority in many countries. Modern electronic systems for Civil Registrations and Vital Statistics (CRVS) can help make this process more efficient and effective.  Yet, most low-income countries still only use paper records for the registration of births, deaths, marriages, or divorces. Retrieving birth registration records, issuing a duplicate copy of a birth certificate or sharing civil registration data with other relevant agencies can be ineffective and time consuming with paper-based systems.

Community involvement is key to eradicating ebola

Michel Muvudi's picture
Also available in: Français
16 January 2019 - Beni, Democratic Republic of Congo. Health workers monitors the health of a patient through the quarantine transparent cube, that allows health workers and family to see the patient from the outside. Vincent Tremeau / World Bank 2019


For several years, Ebola has been ravaging our continent, especially communities in Central and West Africa.  It is exacting a severe human toll and causing significant economic losses in places already burdened by extreme poverty.  My homeland, the Democratic Republic of Congo, is now battling its tenth Ebola outbreak since 1976.

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