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Mauritania

What we can learn from domain name liberalization in Turkey and Tunisia

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How can we best promote the use of Internet by private companies – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – in Africa? This question is of growing significance on a continent where most of the population is under 20 years of age and – compared to the previous generation – increasingly accessing information through digital channels[1] as a result of the rapid expansion of mobile broadband services.

This question is also crucial in terms of growth and competitiveness in the context of the growing economic globalization, where customers and business partners use information and communication technologies in a much more intensive manner.

Mauritanian youth stand ready for ICT-related jobs

Michel Rogy's picture
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According to Mariem Kane (left) and Adi Ould Yacoub, ICT is one of the biggest solutions to the problem of youth employment in Mauritania, their country.
Whenever I visit Nouakchott – the capital of Mauritania  I am told that mobile communications are perfectly suited to the nation's nomadic people, covering areas where there is no fixed network, such as along rural roads or in the dunes where families retreat on weekends. I am also told that the mobile broadband Internet, when it becomes available at more affordable prices and better service quality across the Mauritanian landscape, will be heartily adopted by the population  especially for sending pictures and videos as well as accessing the content available on the web. Mobile technology is already well-supported in the local market: ordinary citizens can get their smartphones or tablets repaired at the "Noghta Sakhina" (Hot Spot) in Nouakchott.
 
But when I am in Mauritania, I rarely hear about the opportunities that Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) can bring in terms of jobs  particularly jobs that require the creativity, innovation and radical new ways of collaboration, interaction and learning that provide professional growth for the nation's youthful population. We are increasingly able to see that young people around the world have remarkable individual capacity to code and develop solutions for applications, including mobile solutions, which dramatically improves their job prospects demand grows for the development of multilingual content on global broadband networks.

Partage d'expérience sur les environnements favorables aux investissements haut débit: la fibre en Turquie

Michel Rogy's picture
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Le développement économique étant fortement corrélé avec l’utilisation de l’Internet haut débit, les gouvernements partout dans le monde cherchent à favoriser le déploiement des technologies large bande. Le gouvernement turc, par exemple, a récemment défini des objectifs ambitieux pour sa stratégie nationale haut débit : 60 millions de clients en 2023 (il y en a 33,7 millions en septembre 2013), une connexion d’au moins 100 Mbit/s pour chaque foyer, avec de la fibre optique déployée vers la plupart des maisons ou immeubles (technologie FFTH (fibre optique jusqu’à la maison) ou FTTB (fibre optique jusqu`à l’immeuble)), la diffusion des technologies haut débit mobile de nouvelle génération (telle que 4G/LTE), et la vision que la Turquie devienne un hub régional pour les infrastructures de télécommunications.

Brokering knowledge on broadband investments environment: Turkey’s approach to fiber

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Because the penetration of high speed internet is strongly correlated with economic growth, governments around the world are eager to promote the diffusion of broadband technologies.  The Turkish Government recently set out ambitious roll-out and take up targets for broadband: 60 million subscriptions in 2023 (up from 33.7 in September 2013), at least 100 Mbps connection for every household, with fiber-optic cables deployed to most homes or buildings (in short: FTTH (Fiber to the Home) or FTTB (Fiber to the Building), diffusion of next generation mobile broadband technologies (such as 4G/LTE), and a vision of the country being a regional hub for telecommunications infrastructure.

Mauritania Ramps up Broadband Internet by Stimulating Private Investment

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The Mauritanian Minister of Economic Affairs and Development, Mr. Sidi Ould Tah, has just signed the WARCIP agreement (Mauritania Program for Regional Communications Infrastructure in West Africa), a program financed by the World Bank that aims to connect all  regions of the country to high-speed Internet by 2015 (for more details: www.warcip.mr). This signature represents for me a new step toward achievement of this project on which I have been working for two years now.