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End of year review: Malaria is declining, and IE should help address the remaining challenges

Jed Friedman's picture

A conference on access to malaria medicine recently held at the World Bank offered many substantive studies – and I will discuss some in detail in the new year. However with my last post of 2011 I’d like to end the year on some good news (even if the news is only partially related to impact evaluation).

Is your CCC or CFC charitable contribution having impact?

David McKenzie's picture

This time of year is when the World Bank has its annual community connections campaign (CCC), where staff are encouraged to contribute to a range of local and international charities. Likewise in Washington the Federal Government runs the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC), which just ended last week. World Bank staff have a choice of 289 charities to choose between; Federal workers have over 4000. So how to choose if you want to have an impact?

Why Students are Protesting all Over the World: Evidence From an RD in Chile: Guest post by Alex Solis

In the past year we have seen students in countries around the world protesting about the cost of higher education and lack of financial aid: Chilean students have been protesting for 7 months to change the overall educational financing system; Californians have occupied the UC Berkeley campus to protest fee hikes, and thousands of English students last year have taken part in protests against increases in tuition fees. Why is this happening all over the world?

What can we learn from medicine: Three mistakes to avoid when designing a trial registry – Guest Post by Ole Dahl Rasmussen

If you are like most people working with quantitative data in development, getting too many statistically significant results is probably not your most pressing problem. On the contrary, if you are lucky enough to find a star, whether it's of the 1%, 5% or 10% type, there are plenty of star-killers to choose from. In what is perhaps the only contribution to the rare genre of 'econometrics haiku', Keisuke Hirano reflects on one of them: T-stat looks too good // Try clustered standard errors - // Significance gone (in Angrist and Pischke's MHE).

More Jobs for Mothers, Better Health for Daughters: Guest Post by Kaveh Majlesi

Across developing countries, there is considerable under-investment in children's human capital; it is reflected in low immunization rates, child malnutrition, high drop-out rates, etc. Because of the (both individual and aggregate) long-term effects of human capital investment during childhood, governments across the globe have designed and implemented policies to encourage parents to invest more in the health and education of their children (numerous conditional cash transfer programs across countries are some examples).

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