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Blog your job market paper, an SME conference, randomizing fear, and more...

David McKenzie's picture

Blog your job market paper? We would love to have readers who are on the job market (as well as those who aren’t but have exciting work to share) do a guest post on their work. If your paper is about impact evaluation, or has a strong measurement component, or otherwise fits with the themes of the blog, we’d love to consider it for a guest post. We propose the following process:

Family Planning Whack-a-Mole

Berk Ozler's picture

Since I reviewed, back in April, the paper by Ashraf, Field, and Lee on the effect of providing vouchers for injectable contraceptives to women in reducing unwanted pregnancies in Lusaka, Zambia, I had been worrying about the use of these modern, convenient, and reliable technologies in those parts of the world in which HIV is highly prevalent.

Pooling risk, saving for health, looking inside the body: what mobile phones may soon allow us to do everywhere

Jed Friedman's picture

On my return from a long work trip in Thailand and the Philippines, I stopped at the University of Southern California to attend the 4th global health supply chain summit. I typically enjoy attending meetings outside my immediate discipline since I get to hear about new ideas in fields far from my own. This conference was no exception.

Democracy isn't dead

Markus Goldstein's picture

At least not in Benin.   This week, I take a look at interesting paper by Leonard Wantchekon documenting an experiment he did in Benin with this year’s presidential election.   In this paper, Leonard compares the results from a deliberative sharing of a candidate’s platform in a local town hall against a one-way communication of the candidate (or his broker) with a big rally.  

Notes from the Field: Consultants in Cape Verde

David McKenzie's picture

I thought I’d kick-start what I hope will be a somewhat regular feature on this blog, which is some insights, observations, and general glimpses of the real world encountered as we work on implementing new impact evaluations. I know some of our readers take umbrage with the term “the field” but I’m sure it is preferred to “Mission musings” , although maybe “Random rambling” might be appropriate.

Getting better access to impact evaluation data

Markus Goldstein's picture

If the data and related metadata collected for impact evaluations was more readily discoverable, searchable, and made available, the world would be a better place.   Well, at least the research would be better.   It would be easier to replicate studies and, in the process, to expand them by for example: trying other outcome indicators; checking robustness; and looking for heterogeneity effects (e.g.

Conditions work! But are they a good thing? (Part II)

Berk Ozler's picture

Yesterday, in Part I of this post, we argued the extant empirical evidence suggests that the conditions cause a substantial amount of the desired behavior change intended by CCT programs. In other words: the “substitution effect” due to the condition may well be larger than the “income effect” of the transfers. For example, in the case of the Malawi experiment, the income effect was responsible for less than half of the total impact on school enrollment.

Conditions work! But are they a good thing? (Part I)

Berk Ozler's picture

One of the questions discussed at the recent World Bank workshop on the "Second Generation of CCT Evaluations" (website, complete with at least some of the presentations, here) was the role of the first C in the performance of the CCT: how important is the condition in accounting for the outcomes of conditional cash transfer programs?

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