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Why don’t we see more work at the intersection of IO and Development? Part Two - methods

David McKenzie's picture
Yesterday’s Q&A with Dan Keniston [DK] and Katja Seim [KS] looked at whether there was a gap in the use of IO methods in development, and for some examples of good work at this intersection of fields. Today I ask about a couple of reasons why we don’t see as much work in this area.

Why don’t we see more work at the intersection of IO and Development? Part One – is there a gap?

David McKenzie's picture
Ever since I was in grad school I remember hearing people say that development and industrial organization (IO) seem like natural fields for graduate students to specialize in, and yet my sense is that far fewer people take this combination than development and labor, or development and public economics for example. This is seen in literature produced – the figure below shows the share of the last 100 BREAD Working Papers in development that have different subfields (according to their JEL codes):

Friday links November 8: Halloween redux, aspirations, rants against the wrong questions, and more…

David McKenzie's picture
  • On the CSAE blog – the reverse couch potato effect-  the impact of inspirational movies on aspirations and short-term behavior – new work by Stefan Dercon, Tanguy Bernard, Kate Orkin and Alemayehu Taffesse. The blog post has a couple of examples of the movies used to show people in rural Ethiopia how people like them had made choices that had led to success.

Policy learning with impact evaluation and the “science of delivery”

Jed Friedman's picture
The “science of delivery”, a relatively new term among development practitioners, refers to the focused study of the processes, contexts, and general determinants of the delivery of public services and goods. Or to paraphrase my colleague Adam Wagstaff, the term represents a broadening of inquiry towards an understanding of the “how to deliver” and not simply a focus on the “what to deliver”.
 

Learn to live without external validity

Berk Ozler's picture
We promised some time ago to review the recent working paper by Pritchett and Sandefur on external validity, and the title of this post is the main take-away for me: my name is Berk Özler and I agree with this specific message. However, while I’d like to say that there is much more here, I am afraid that I, personally, did not find more to write home about...

The program costs of impact evaluation

Markus Goldstein's picture
I was at a workshop last week where I was moderating a discussion of the practicalities of doing impact evaluations in conflict and post-conflict settings.  One of the program-implementation folks made clear that working with the impact evaluation was a strain -- as she put it this "was pulling our field staff through a keyhole".   Which got me thinking about the costs that we, as impact evaluators, can cause for a program.   
 

From the Annals of Puzzles: Why Indian Children Are More Stunted than African Children

Berk Ozler's picture
I recently finished teaching smart and hard working honours students. In Growth and Development, we covered equity and talked about inequalities of opportunity (and outcomes) across countries, across regions within countries, between different ethnic groups, genders, etc. In Population and Labour Economics, we covered intra-household bargaining models and how spending on children may vary depending on the relative bargaining power of the parents.

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