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Berk Ozler's blog

Weekly Links, July 15 -- U.S. Edition: what does police bias have to do with colliders, questions on POTUS publishing in JAMA.

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  • What’s JAMA’s new impact factor now that POTUS has published a paper there? As you probably heard, Mr. Obama published a paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association this week, describing the progress to date of the US Health Care Reform and outlining the next steps. I have so many questions: was the review process (if there was one) double blind? Was he first rejected from NEJM? Was there a revise and resubmit? Was Obama totally nice to that rude referee #2, so that his paper could get published without further hassle? If you’re a handling editor or a referee, we want to hear from you (anonymously or not)...

Definitions in RCTs with interference

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On May 25, I attended a workshop organized by the Harvard School of Public Health, titled “Causal Inference with Highly Dependent Data in Communicable Diseases Research.” I got to meet many of the “who’s who” of this literature from the fields of biostatistics, public health, and political science, among whom was Elizabeth Halloran, who co-authored this paper with Michael Hudgens – one of the more influential papers in the field.

Weekly Links, May 27: Conscious insects, good data collection practices, all male panels, and more...

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  • On selecting what variables to gather data for in your impact evaluation: Carneiro et al. have a new paper out – “Optimal Data Collection for Randomized Control Trials” – which argues that if you have a household survey or census in advance, you can use an algorithm to select the right covariates, potentially reducing data collection costs or improving precision substantially.

Issues of data collection and measurement

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About five years ago, soon after we started this blog, I wrote a blog post titled “Economists have experiments figured out. What’s next? (Hint: It’s Measurement)” Soon after the post, I had folks from IPA email me saying we should experiment with some important measurement issues, making use of IPA’s network of studies around the world.

GiveDirectly just announced a basic income grant experiment. Here is how to make it better.

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In an article in Slate yesterday, co-founders of GiveDirectly announced that they will provide at least 6,000 people in Kenya with a basic income grant (BIG) for a period of 10-15 years, which will cost about $30 million. The proposal is scant in details at the moment, but this article in Vox suggests that dozens of villages will randomly be selected in an already selected region of Kenya for this exercise and everyone within will be given roughly a dollar a day per person for a decade.

Excuse me Mr. Can’t you see the children dying?

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In 1997, Peter Singer wrote about a dilemma he’d pose to his students about a drowning child in a pond on their way to class: “would they be willing to save the child at the cost of getting all wet, having to go back home to change, and missing the first period?” After getting the expected answer that they all would, he’d ask about a hypothetical child far away, and ways that the students could save lives elsewhere at “no great cost – and absolutely no danger – to themselves. This would lead to a discussion of a version of effective altruism two decades ago.

Friday Links: Frustrating research, Fryer's tome, sinister virus, and more...

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Teacher Turnover and Student Performance

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Selective teacher retention policies are both complex and controversial wherever they’re implemented. In Washington, DC, where I live and work, things are no different: pursuit of such policies arguably led to the early departures of a mayor and the chancellor of the public school system (DCPS). A January 2016 paper by Adnot, Dee, Katz, and Wyckoff evaluates the effect of teacher turnover under on student achievement under IMPACT, DCPS’ performance assessment and incentive system for its teachers – introduced in the 2009-10 school year (NBER WP version, gated, can be found here.

Impostor Syndrome

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Josh Ritter is one of my favorite musicians. So, imagine my joy when I saw that he was doing an essay in the middle of PBS Newshour this past Thursday – what is normally a depressing hour these days, full of bad news from Flint, South Sudan, Republican primaries and debates, and much more. The essay started with footage of him (seemingly at the 9:30 Club in DC) singing Homecoming: great.

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